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Methylococcaceae are the dominant active aerobic methanotrophs in a Chinese tidal marsh

Methylococcaceae are the dominant active aerobic methanotrophs in a Chinese tidal marsh
Methylococcaceae are the dominant active aerobic methanotrophs in a Chinese tidal marsh

Although coastal marshes are net carbon sinks, they are net methane sources. Aerobic methanotrophs in coastal marsh soils are important methane consumers, but their activity and populations are poorly characterized. DNA stable-isotope probing followed by sequencing was used to determine how active methanotrophic populations differed in the main habitats of a Chinese coastal marsh. These habitats included mudflat, native plant-dominated, and alien plant-dominated habitats. Methylococcaceae was the most active methanotroph family across four habitats. Abundant methylotroph sequences, including methanotrophs and non-methane-oxidizing methylotrophs (Methylotenera and Methylophaga), constituted 50–70% of the 16S rRNA genes detected in the labeled native plant-dominated and mudflat soils. Methylotrophs were less abundant (~ 20%) in labeled alien plant-dominated soil, suggesting less methane assimilation into the target community or a different extent of carbon cross-feeding. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated a significant correlation between the active bacterial communities and soil properties (salinity, organic carbon, total nitrogen, pH, and available phosphorus). Importantly, these results highlight how changing vegetation or soil features in coastal marshes may change their resident active methanotrophic populations, which will further influence methane cycling.

DNA-SIP, Methane, Methanotrophs, Methylococcaceae, Spartina alterniflora, Tidal marsh
0944-1344
1-11
Deng, Yongcui
5823c5fe-5a0d-4002-972c-48882272a423
Gui, Qian
d5728c45-349a-40a0-97ac-a6db0c3f6096
Dumont, Marc
afd9f08f-bdbb-4cee-b792-1a7f000ee511
Han, Cheng
aa6d6161-24cf-4320-844f-27b82063aad5
Deng, Huan
f2f5ae65-75a8-4408-9a0d-dc85250812e7
Yun, Juanli
0badad08-2bd1-49c2-b0c7-ff89bc8540af
Zhong, Wenhui
d4050c01-7bd7-4254-b722-bbec1184ee8c
Deng, Yongcui
5823c5fe-5a0d-4002-972c-48882272a423
Gui, Qian
d5728c45-349a-40a0-97ac-a6db0c3f6096
Dumont, Marc
afd9f08f-bdbb-4cee-b792-1a7f000ee511
Han, Cheng
aa6d6161-24cf-4320-844f-27b82063aad5
Deng, Huan
f2f5ae65-75a8-4408-9a0d-dc85250812e7
Yun, Juanli
0badad08-2bd1-49c2-b0c7-ff89bc8540af
Zhong, Wenhui
d4050c01-7bd7-4254-b722-bbec1184ee8c

Deng, Yongcui, Gui, Qian, Dumont, Marc, Han, Cheng, Deng, Huan, Yun, Juanli and Zhong, Wenhui (2018) Methylococcaceae are the dominant active aerobic methanotrophs in a Chinese tidal marsh. Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 1-11. (doi:10.1007/s11356-018-3560-3).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Although coastal marshes are net carbon sinks, they are net methane sources. Aerobic methanotrophs in coastal marsh soils are important methane consumers, but their activity and populations are poorly characterized. DNA stable-isotope probing followed by sequencing was used to determine how active methanotrophic populations differed in the main habitats of a Chinese coastal marsh. These habitats included mudflat, native plant-dominated, and alien plant-dominated habitats. Methylococcaceae was the most active methanotroph family across four habitats. Abundant methylotroph sequences, including methanotrophs and non-methane-oxidizing methylotrophs (Methylotenera and Methylophaga), constituted 50–70% of the 16S rRNA genes detected in the labeled native plant-dominated and mudflat soils. Methylotrophs were less abundant (~ 20%) in labeled alien plant-dominated soil, suggesting less methane assimilation into the target community or a different extent of carbon cross-feeding. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated a significant correlation between the active bacterial communities and soil properties (salinity, organic carbon, total nitrogen, pH, and available phosphorus). Importantly, these results highlight how changing vegetation or soil features in coastal marshes may change their resident active methanotrophic populations, which will further influence methane cycling.

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ESPR_13th_SEP_2018_final - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 22 October 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 8 November 2018
Keywords: DNA-SIP, Methane, Methanotrophs, Methylococcaceae, Spartina alterniflora, Tidal marsh

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 426887
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/426887
ISSN: 0944-1344
PURE UUID: 961cd918-3d2c-4c3f-aaa3-f6080fb242d4
ORCID for Marc Dumont: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7347-8668

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Dec 2018 17:30
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 05:07

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