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Systems Theoretic Accident Model and Process (STAMP) applied to a Royal Navy Hawk jet missile simulation exercise

Systems Theoretic Accident Model and Process (STAMP) applied to a Royal Navy Hawk jet missile simulation exercise
Systems Theoretic Accident Model and Process (STAMP) applied to a Royal Navy Hawk jet missile simulation exercise
The Royal Navy uses Hawk jets to simulate sea-skimming missile attacks against vessels as part of their training regulations. To best achieve these goals, pilots of the Hawk are required to fly at approximately 50 feet above sea level to accurately mimic the flight path of a missile. Despite this need the Hawk is not equipped with a radar altimeter and instead relies upon pilot skill to ensure the safe completion of the operation. Incidents whereby the Hawk jets have struck the water are however recorded, risking pilot safety. This paper explores the Hawk missile simulation task using a Systems Theoretic Accident Model and Process (STAMP) and its corresponding hazard analysis Systems-Theoretic Process Analysis (STPA) methodology to map the key stakeholders within this operation. In doing so, the method explores areas of potential risk in the system and recommends how overall systemic safety of the operation can be improved.
0925-7535
Stanton, Neville
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Harvey, Catherine
f42f4188-ccb5-4a2e-bea9-4606c1c924e9
Allison, Craig
46b3ce37-1986-4a23-9385-a54d0abd08d5
Stanton, Neville
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Harvey, Catherine
f42f4188-ccb5-4a2e-bea9-4606c1c924e9
Allison, Craig
46b3ce37-1986-4a23-9385-a54d0abd08d5

Stanton, Neville, Harvey, Catherine and Allison, Craig (2019) Systems Theoretic Accident Model and Process (STAMP) applied to a Royal Navy Hawk jet missile simulation exercise. Safety Science. (doi:10.1016/j.ssci.2018.12.020).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The Royal Navy uses Hawk jets to simulate sea-skimming missile attacks against vessels as part of their training regulations. To best achieve these goals, pilots of the Hawk are required to fly at approximately 50 feet above sea level to accurately mimic the flight path of a missile. Despite this need the Hawk is not equipped with a radar altimeter and instead relies upon pilot skill to ensure the safe completion of the operation. Incidents whereby the Hawk jets have struck the water are however recorded, risking pilot safety. This paper explores the Hawk missile simulation task using a Systems Theoretic Accident Model and Process (STAMP) and its corresponding hazard analysis Systems-Theoretic Process Analysis (STPA) methodology to map the key stakeholders within this operation. In doing so, the method explores areas of potential risk in the system and recommends how overall systemic safety of the operation can be improved.

Text
HAWK STAMP_3RD_RESUBMISSION_BLIND - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 19 December 2021.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 19 December 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 29 December 2018
Published date: March 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 427056
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/427056
ISSN: 0925-7535
PURE UUID: 81c2ecbb-1967-4757-8caa-fbb48b7f6a32
ORCID for Neville Stanton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8562-3279

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Dec 2018 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 04:34

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