The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Perspectives on political party death: Theorizing and testing Downsian and sociological rationales

Perspectives on political party death: Theorizing and testing Downsian and sociological rationales
Perspectives on political party death: Theorizing and testing Downsian and sociological rationales

Which of the new political parties that emerged in advanced democracies faded away and which ones managed to survive and why? Considering a party as dead once it ceases to nominate candidates in any elections, we develop two sets of hypotheses to account for party death derived from two conceptions of political parties. One conceptualizes parties as vehicles formed by career-oriented politicians eager to maximize individual rewards. Failure to deliver seats or government access is therefore expected to predict an earlier death. The other conceptualizes parties as societal organizations that serve representational functions valued in themselves by elites and members alike. This conception stresses the importance of roots in society or ideological novelty. Using survival analysis, we test our hypotheses in 17 advanced democracies based on a new data set covering 144 new parties from birth until their (potential) death. Arguments derived from both conceptions have significant support stressing the complexity of the drivers underpinning parties' very existence.

long-lived democracies, new parties, party death, party failure, party organization
1755-7739
Bolleyer, Nicole
3f3eb3d7-092b-43cb-99ae-e7d51e0c988e
Ibenskas, Raimondas
160594d0-2151-4be5-8d77-90418186dbc1
Bischoff, Carina
86cc8495-b53f-434e-bb5d-36efd11dc4f6
Bolleyer, Nicole
3f3eb3d7-092b-43cb-99ae-e7d51e0c988e
Ibenskas, Raimondas
160594d0-2151-4be5-8d77-90418186dbc1
Bischoff, Carina
86cc8495-b53f-434e-bb5d-36efd11dc4f6

Bolleyer, Nicole, Ibenskas, Raimondas and Bischoff, Carina (2018) Perspectives on political party death: Theorizing and testing Downsian and sociological rationales. European Political Science Review. (doi:10.1017/S1755773918000176).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Which of the new political parties that emerged in advanced democracies faded away and which ones managed to survive and why? Considering a party as dead once it ceases to nominate candidates in any elections, we develop two sets of hypotheses to account for party death derived from two conceptions of political parties. One conceptualizes parties as vehicles formed by career-oriented politicians eager to maximize individual rewards. Failure to deliver seats or government access is therefore expected to predict an earlier death. The other conceptualizes parties as societal organizations that serve representational functions valued in themselves by elites and members alike. This conception stresses the importance of roots in society or ideological novelty. Using survival analysis, we test our hypotheses in 17 advanced democracies based on a new data set covering 144 new parties from birth until their (potential) death. Arguments derived from both conceptions have significant support stressing the complexity of the drivers underpinning parties' very existence.

Text
EPSR Bolleyer Party_Survival_epsr_Revision_R1_Final july 18 - Accepted Manuscript
Download (134kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 18 July 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 16 November 2018
Keywords: long-lived democracies, new parties, party death, party failure, party organization

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 427082
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/427082
ISSN: 1755-7739
PURE UUID: e0259104-c8ba-421b-8552-1624d83be98a
ORCID for Raimondas Ibenskas: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4128-9464

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Dec 2018 16:31
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 17:44

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×