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Health geography in New Zealand and Australia: global integration or Antipodean exceptionalism?

Health geography in New Zealand and Australia: global integration or Antipodean exceptionalism?
Health geography in New Zealand and Australia: global integration or Antipodean exceptionalism?
This paper examines the hallmarks of an emergent and distinctive Australian and New Zealand (NZ) heath geography over the last 30 years. Building on an assessment of the early development of the sub-discipline in the two countries, a review of published work reveals the co-presence of local themes alongside connections to more global perspectives associated notably with health behaviour. Further common themes are the influence of year-round exposure to outdoor spaces and the proximity of “blue spaces” to urban centres. However, there are divergences in the evolution of the sub-discipline. A comparison of attendance at the biennial International Medical Geography Symposia (held since 1985) with publications in the journal Health & Place reveal differentially globalised characters. A steady flow of international visitors and appointments to New Zealand universities as well as more apparent connections to the wider discipline of geography contrast with more applied geo-spatial and public health connections in Australian health geography.
health geography; medical geography; well-being; sub-disciplinary development; Australia; New Zealand
1745-5871
8-23
Moon, Graham
68cffc4d-72c1-41e9-b1fa-1570c5f3a0b4
Kearns, Robin
24b11ec7-7029-4c61-a09c-3745468ee912
Moon, Graham
68cffc4d-72c1-41e9-b1fa-1570c5f3a0b4
Kearns, Robin
24b11ec7-7029-4c61-a09c-3745468ee912

Moon, Graham and Kearns, Robin (2019) Health geography in New Zealand and Australia: global integration or Antipodean exceptionalism? Geographical Research, 57 (1), 8-23. (doi:10.1111/1745-5871.12336).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper examines the hallmarks of an emergent and distinctive Australian and New Zealand (NZ) heath geography over the last 30 years. Building on an assessment of the early development of the sub-discipline in the two countries, a review of published work reveals the co-presence of local themes alongside connections to more global perspectives associated notably with health behaviour. Further common themes are the influence of year-round exposure to outdoor spaces and the proximity of “blue spaces” to urban centres. However, there are divergences in the evolution of the sub-discipline. A comparison of attendance at the biennial International Medical Geography Symposia (held since 1985) with publications in the journal Health & Place reveal differentially globalised characters. A steady flow of international visitors and appointments to New Zealand universities as well as more apparent connections to the wider discipline of geography contrast with more applied geo-spatial and public health connections in Australian health geography.

Text
Geographical Research, final submitted - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 16 December 2020.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 16 December 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 13 February 2019
Published date: February 2019
Keywords: health geography; medical geography; well-being; sub-disciplinary development; Australia; New Zealand

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 427391
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/427391
ISSN: 1745-5871
PURE UUID: a56e72eb-3905-4c94-91a1-08d8d0d79b24
ORCID for Graham Moon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7256-8397

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Jan 2019 17:30
Last modified: 21 Mar 2019 01:33

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