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A discussion of statistical methods to characterize early growth and its impact on bone mineral content later in childhood

A discussion of statistical methods to characterize early growth and its impact on bone mineral content later in childhood
A discussion of statistical methods to characterize early growth and its impact on bone mineral content later in childhood
Background: Many statistical methods are available to model longitudinal growth data and relate derived summary measures to later outcomes.

Aim: To apply and compare commonly used methods to a realistic scenario including pre- and postnatal data, missing data, and confounders.

Subjects and methods: Data were collected from 753 offspring in the Southampton Women’s Survey with measurements of bone mineral content (BMC) at age 6 years. Ultrasound measures included crown-rump length (11 weeks’ gestation) and femur length (19 and 34 weeks’ gestation); postnatally, infant length (birth, 6 and 12 months) and height (2 and 3 years) were measured. A residual growth model, two-stage multilevel linear spline model, joint multilevel linear spline model, SITAR and a growth mixture model were used to relate growth to 6-year BMC.

Results: Results from the residual growth, two-stage and joint multilevel linear spline models were most comparable: an increase in length at all ages was positively associated with BMC, the strongest association being with later growth. Both SITAR and the growth mixture model demonstrated that length was positively associated with BMC.

Conclusions: Similarities and differences in results from a variety of analytic strategies need to be understood in the context of each statistical methodology.
1464-5033
17-26
Crozier, Sarah
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Johnson, William
5107641f-ac1c-4f74-8980-9bd71d4282fd
Cole, Tim J.
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Macdonald-Wallis, Corrie
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Muniz-Terrera, Graciela
d37a16d8-acef-4135-9e79-5a98abab9527
Inskip, Hazel
5fb4470a-9379-49b2-a533-9da8e61058b7
Tilling, Kate
016f1a6c-9568-4211-84d4-019f2c1d7b38
Crozier, Sarah
9c3595ce-45b0-44fa-8c4c-4c555e628a03
Johnson, William
5107641f-ac1c-4f74-8980-9bd71d4282fd
Cole, Tim J.
78cebdf5-e360-4e8e-9dea-ba4b88306980
Macdonald-Wallis, Corrie
02b5800b-edbd-4142-b25b-e5018c543e11
Muniz-Terrera, Graciela
d37a16d8-acef-4135-9e79-5a98abab9527
Inskip, Hazel
5fb4470a-9379-49b2-a533-9da8e61058b7
Tilling, Kate
016f1a6c-9568-4211-84d4-019f2c1d7b38

Crozier, Sarah, Johnson, William, Cole, Tim J., Macdonald-Wallis, Corrie, Muniz-Terrera, Graciela, Inskip, Hazel and Tilling, Kate (2019) A discussion of statistical methods to characterize early growth and its impact on bone mineral content later in childhood. Annals of Human Biology, 17-26. (doi:10.1080/03014460.2019.1574896).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Many statistical methods are available to model longitudinal growth data and relate derived summary measures to later outcomes.

Aim: To apply and compare commonly used methods to a realistic scenario including pre- and postnatal data, missing data, and confounders.

Subjects and methods: Data were collected from 753 offspring in the Southampton Women’s Survey with measurements of bone mineral content (BMC) at age 6 years. Ultrasound measures included crown-rump length (11 weeks’ gestation) and femur length (19 and 34 weeks’ gestation); postnatally, infant length (birth, 6 and 12 months) and height (2 and 3 years) were measured. A residual growth model, two-stage multilevel linear spline model, joint multilevel linear spline model, SITAR and a growth mixture model were used to relate growth to 6-year BMC.

Results: Results from the residual growth, two-stage and joint multilevel linear spline models were most comparable: an increase in length at all ages was positively associated with BMC, the strongest association being with later growth. Both SITAR and the growth mixture model demonstrated that length was positively associated with BMC.

Conclusions: Similarities and differences in results from a variety of analytic strategies need to be understood in the context of each statistical methodology.

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SWSGrowthMethodComparisonPaper40AHB - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 31 December 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 5 February 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 427406
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/427406
ISSN: 1464-5033
PURE UUID: 6ec36655-503e-4493-bb5e-9fdc6842b374
ORCID for Sarah Crozier: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9524-1127
ORCID for Hazel Inskip: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8897-1749

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Date deposited: 15 Jan 2019 17:30
Last modified: 22 Nov 2021 07:05

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Contributors

Author: Sarah Crozier ORCID iD
Author: William Johnson
Author: Tim J. Cole
Author: Corrie Macdonald-Wallis
Author: Graciela Muniz-Terrera
Author: Hazel Inskip ORCID iD
Author: Kate Tilling

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