The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Envelope frequency following responses are stronger for high-pass than low-pass filtered vowels

Envelope frequency following responses are stronger for high-pass than low-pass filtered vowels
Envelope frequency following responses are stronger for high-pass than low-pass filtered vowels

Background: To assess hearing in response to speech, the envelope frequency following response (FFR) can be observed at the fundamental frequency of a vowel stimulus and its harmonics. FFRs are complex non-linear phenomena, which require better understanding for allowing robust inferences on the assessment of hearing and hearing aid fitting. Objectives: To evaluate the effect of stimulus bandwidth on FFR detection rates using filtered vowel stimuli with equal sound levels. Design: FFRs were collected whilst presenting repeated vowels (in consonant-vowel-consonant format) filtered into different bandwidths. Eighty stimuli per word were presented at 70 dB SPL LAeq through insert earphones with an inter-stimulus interval of 1 s. Responses were detected using frequency-domain Hotelling's T2 (HT2) tests for individual multiples of the fundamental frequency (F0) and for combinations of F0 multiples. Study sample: A total of 11 native English-speaking subjects with normal hearing thresholds. Results: Average detection rates are highest (69%) with stimuli high-pass filtered >1000 Hz, and significantly lower for low-pass filtered stimuli (40%). Conclusions: High-pass filtered vowels therefore appear to elicit stronger FFRs than low-pass filtered vowels at the same dB SPL LAeq. For testing hearing using band-limited speech, filtering effects (due to hearing loss, hearing aid setting or stimulus choice) on responses must be considered.

adult or general hearing screening, Electrophysiology, envelope frequency following responses, Hotelling’s T, objective response detection, speech perception
1499-2027
1-9
Vanheusden, Frederique J.
c3022456-907d-4dfa-b537-b3fbc119d76b
Chesnaye, Michael A.
5f337509-3255-4322-b1bf-d4d3836b36ec
Simpson, David M.
53674880-f381-4cc9-8505-6a97eeac3c2a
Bell, Steven L.
91de0801-d2b7-44ba-8e8e-523e672aed8a
Vanheusden, Frederique J.
c3022456-907d-4dfa-b537-b3fbc119d76b
Chesnaye, Michael A.
5f337509-3255-4322-b1bf-d4d3836b36ec
Simpson, David M.
53674880-f381-4cc9-8505-6a97eeac3c2a
Bell, Steven L.
91de0801-d2b7-44ba-8e8e-523e672aed8a

Vanheusden, Frederique J., Chesnaye, Michael A., Simpson, David M. and Bell, Steven L. (2019) Envelope frequency following responses are stronger for high-pass than low-pass filtered vowels. International Journal of Audiology, 1-9. (doi:10.1080/14992027.2018.1562243).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: To assess hearing in response to speech, the envelope frequency following response (FFR) can be observed at the fundamental frequency of a vowel stimulus and its harmonics. FFRs are complex non-linear phenomena, which require better understanding for allowing robust inferences on the assessment of hearing and hearing aid fitting. Objectives: To evaluate the effect of stimulus bandwidth on FFR detection rates using filtered vowel stimuli with equal sound levels. Design: FFRs were collected whilst presenting repeated vowels (in consonant-vowel-consonant format) filtered into different bandwidths. Eighty stimuli per word were presented at 70 dB SPL LAeq through insert earphones with an inter-stimulus interval of 1 s. Responses were detected using frequency-domain Hotelling's T2 (HT2) tests for individual multiples of the fundamental frequency (F0) and for combinations of F0 multiples. Study sample: A total of 11 native English-speaking subjects with normal hearing thresholds. Results: Average detection rates are highest (69%) with stimuli high-pass filtered >1000 Hz, and significantly lower for low-pass filtered stimuli (40%). Conclusions: High-pass filtered vowels therefore appear to elicit stronger FFRs than low-pass filtered vowels at the same dB SPL LAeq. For testing hearing using band-limited speech, filtering effects (due to hearing loss, hearing aid setting or stimulus choice) on responses must be considered.

Text
Final Version Envelope frequency Following responses are stronger._ - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 24 August 2020.
Request a copy
Text
Vanheusden_IJA - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 13 December 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 24 January 2019
Keywords: adult or general hearing screening, Electrophysiology, envelope frequency following responses, Hotelling’s T, objective response detection, speech perception

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 428028
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/428028
ISSN: 1499-2027
PURE UUID: 4c14a77c-1880-4866-a2c6-bb08f4c763f7
ORCID for Frederique J. Vanheusden: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2369-6189

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Feb 2019 17:30
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 16:42

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Frederique J. Vanheusden ORCID iD
Author: Michael A. Chesnaye
Author: Steven L. Bell

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×