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The unexpected rise of cohabitation in the Philippines: evidence of socioeconomic disadvantage or a second demographic transition?

The unexpected rise of cohabitation in the Philippines: evidence of socioeconomic disadvantage or a second demographic transition?
The unexpected rise of cohabitation in the Philippines: evidence of socioeconomic disadvantage or a second demographic transition?

Cohabitation has increased rapidly in the Philippines, quadrupling in prevalence from 6 per cent in 1993 to 24 per cent in 2013 among young adult women. This increase is dramatic and exceptional given the slow change in other family behaviours, such as low divorce rates and continued high fertility, and the persistent influence of the Catholic Church. While cohabitation is often framed as evidence of ideational change and liberalisation, its continued uptake over time may be associated with socio-economic conditions. Using the 2013 national demographic and health surveys, we apply a discrete-time competing risks model to examine the relationship between socio-economic status and cohabitation, using education as proxy for resources and opportunities available to women. Our findings demonstrate that lower levels of education are significantly associated with a higher risk of cohabitation, which suggests rising cohabitation in the Philippines is more linked to socio-economic disadvantage than the devaluing of marriage among educated elites.

Cohabitation, demographic and health surveys, education, marriage, Philippines, second demographic transition
1744-1730
Kuang, Bernice
728d0a4d-71e0-4c21-bc63-990c1df1acf7
Perelli-Harris, Brienna
9d3d6b25-d710-480b-8677-534d58ebe9ed
Padmadas, Sabu
64b6ab89-152b-48a3-838b-e9167964b508
Kuang, Bernice
728d0a4d-71e0-4c21-bc63-990c1df1acf7
Perelli-Harris, Brienna
9d3d6b25-d710-480b-8677-534d58ebe9ed
Padmadas, Sabu
64b6ab89-152b-48a3-838b-e9167964b508

Kuang, Bernice, Perelli-Harris, Brienna and Padmadas, Sabu (2019) The unexpected rise of cohabitation in the Philippines: evidence of socioeconomic disadvantage or a second demographic transition? Asian Population Studies. (doi:10.1080/17441730.2018.1560664).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Cohabitation has increased rapidly in the Philippines, quadrupling in prevalence from 6 per cent in 1993 to 24 per cent in 2013 among young adult women. This increase is dramatic and exceptional given the slow change in other family behaviours, such as low divorce rates and continued high fertility, and the persistent influence of the Catholic Church. While cohabitation is often framed as evidence of ideational change and liberalisation, its continued uptake over time may be associated with socio-economic conditions. Using the 2013 national demographic and health surveys, we apply a discrete-time competing risks model to examine the relationship between socio-economic status and cohabitation, using education as proxy for resources and opportunities available to women. Our findings demonstrate that lower levels of education are significantly associated with a higher risk of cohabitation, which suggests rising cohabitation in the Philippines is more linked to socio-economic disadvantage than the devaluing of marriage among educated elites.

Text
Cohabitation in the Philippines - Kuang et al_ - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 28 July 2020.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 1 March 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 28 January 2019
Keywords: Cohabitation, demographic and health surveys, education, marriage, Philippines, second demographic transition

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 428446
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/428446
ISSN: 1744-1730
PURE UUID: 74dc8033-55c2-45eb-abe0-5871c19b2d38
ORCID for Sabu Padmadas: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6538-9374

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Feb 2019 17:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:44

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