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Maternal and early-life area-level characteristics and childhood adiposity: a systematic review

Maternal and early-life area-level characteristics and childhood adiposity: a systematic review
Maternal and early-life area-level characteristics and childhood adiposity: a systematic review
There is a cross‐sectional evidence that physical and social environments are linked to childhood adiposity. Evidence is scarce for the role of preconception, pregnancy, and early‐life area‐level characteristics in shaping childhood adiposity. We aimed to systematically review evidence for associations between physical and social environmental conditions experienced in these periods and childhood adiposity. Published literature was identified from the CINAHL, Embase, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO databases. Longitudinal studies linking an area‐level environmental exposure in the preconception, pregnancy, or early‐life (less than 1 year) periods and a measure of adiposity between the ages of 2 and 12 years were examined. Eight studies in the United States, Denmark, South Korea, United Kingdom, and Canada satisfied the inclusion criteria. Storm‐induced maternal stress, nitrogen oxides exposure, traffic noise, and proximity were associated with greater childhood adiposity. Frequent neighbourhood disturbances were associated with lower adiposity, while particulate matter exposure was associated with both higher and lower adiposity in childhood. Area‐level characteristics may play a role in the ongoing obesity epidemic. There is a limited evidence of longitudinal associations between preconception, pregnancy, and early‐life area‐level characteristics with childhood adiposity. Numerous factors that appear important in cross‐sectional research have yet to be assessed longitudinally, both individually and in combination.
1467-7881
1093-1105
Wilding, Sam
a026cae1-cc72-49b5-a52b-ec1d931d72e1
Ziauddeen, Nida
3ad67dd8-26ba-498a-af0a-b1174298995b
Smith, Dianna
e859097c-f9f5-4fd0-8b07-59218648e726
Roderick, Paul
dbb3cd11-4c51-4844-982b-0eb30ad5085a
Alwan, Nisreen
0d37b320-f325-4ed3-ba51-0fe2866d5382
Wilding, Sam
a026cae1-cc72-49b5-a52b-ec1d931d72e1
Ziauddeen, Nida
3ad67dd8-26ba-498a-af0a-b1174298995b
Smith, Dianna
e859097c-f9f5-4fd0-8b07-59218648e726
Roderick, Paul
dbb3cd11-4c51-4844-982b-0eb30ad5085a
Alwan, Nisreen
0d37b320-f325-4ed3-ba51-0fe2866d5382

Wilding, Sam, Ziauddeen, Nida, Smith, Dianna, Roderick, Paul and Alwan, Nisreen (2019) Maternal and early-life area-level characteristics and childhood adiposity: a systematic review. Obesity Reviews, 20 (8), 1093-1105. (doi:10.1111/obr.12861).

Record type: Article

Abstract

There is a cross‐sectional evidence that physical and social environments are linked to childhood adiposity. Evidence is scarce for the role of preconception, pregnancy, and early‐life area‐level characteristics in shaping childhood adiposity. We aimed to systematically review evidence for associations between physical and social environmental conditions experienced in these periods and childhood adiposity. Published literature was identified from the CINAHL, Embase, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO databases. Longitudinal studies linking an area‐level environmental exposure in the preconception, pregnancy, or early‐life (less than 1 year) periods and a measure of adiposity between the ages of 2 and 12 years were examined. Eight studies in the United States, Denmark, South Korea, United Kingdom, and Canada satisfied the inclusion criteria. Storm‐induced maternal stress, nitrogen oxides exposure, traffic noise, and proximity were associated with greater childhood adiposity. Frequent neighbourhood disturbances were associated with lower adiposity, while particulate matter exposure was associated with both higher and lower adiposity in childhood. Area‐level characteristics may play a role in the ongoing obesity epidemic. There is a limited evidence of longitudinal associations between preconception, pregnancy, and early‐life area‐level characteristics with childhood adiposity. Numerous factors that appear important in cross‐sectional research have yet to be assessed longitudinally, both individually and in combination.

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SW_systematic_rev_submitted_manuscript_19_2_19 - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 10 February 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 29 April 2019
Published date: August 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 428567
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/428567
ISSN: 1467-7881
PURE UUID: 42aec323-a89c-45dd-9f0e-b5e2dddbf8d0
ORCID for Sam Wilding: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4184-2821
ORCID for Dianna Smith: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0650-6606
ORCID for Paul Roderick: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9475-6850
ORCID for Nisreen Alwan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4134-8463

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Date deposited: 01 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 10 Feb 2020 05:01

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