The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Using geospatial modelling to estimate the prevalence of adolescent first births in Nepal

Using geospatial modelling to estimate the prevalence of adolescent first births in Nepal
Using geospatial modelling to estimate the prevalence of adolescent first births in Nepal
Introduction: Adolescent pregnancy is associated with significant risks and disadvantages for young women and girls and their children. A clear understanding of population subgroups with particularly high prevalence of first births in adolescence is vital if appropriate national responses are to be developed. This paper aims to provide detailed data on socioeconomic and geographic inequities in first births to adolescents in Nepal, including wealth quintile,education, rural/urban residence and geographic region. A key element is the use of geospatial modelling to develop estimates for the prevalence of adolescent births at the district level.
Methods: The study uses data from the 2011 Nepal Demographic and Health Survey. Initial cross-tabulations present disaggregated data by socioeconomic status and basic geographic region. Estimates of prevalence of adolescent first births at the district level are creating by regression modelling using the Integrated Nested Laplace Approximation package in R software.
Results: Our findings show that 40% of women had given birth before the age of 20 years, with 5% giving birth before 16 years. First births to adolescents remain common among poorer, less educated and rural women. Geographic disparities are striking, with estimates for the percentage of women giving birth before 20 years ranging from 35% to 53% by region. District level estimates showed even more marked differentials (26%–67% had given birth by 20 years), with marked heterogeneity even within regions. In some districts, estimates for the prevalence of first birth among the youngest age groups(<16 years) are high.
Conclusion: Important geographic and socioeconomic inequities exist in adolescent first births. In some districts and within some subgroups, there remain high levels of adolescent first births, including births to very young adolescents. The use of Bayesian geospatial modelling techniques can be used by policymakers to target resources.
2059-7908
Neal, Sarah
2b63ebf7-1cf9-423d-80a2-bd99a759f784
Ruktanonchai, Corrine W.
44e6fcd0-246b-480e-8940-9557dbb7c0cc
Chandra-Mouli, Venkatraman
35234274-1c30-4a20-8a1b-edb3363321ac
Harvey, Chloe
e69b10a8-85f5-4eeb-9932-4e92a59a097c
Matthews, Zoe
ebaee878-8cb8-415f-8aa1-3af2c3856f55
Raina, Neena
f7d1ec0c-597b-4d55-aec5-930e3615ce46
Tatem, Andrew
6c6de104-a5f9-46e0-bb93-a1a7c980513e
Neal, Sarah
2b63ebf7-1cf9-423d-80a2-bd99a759f784
Ruktanonchai, Corrine W.
44e6fcd0-246b-480e-8940-9557dbb7c0cc
Chandra-Mouli, Venkatraman
35234274-1c30-4a20-8a1b-edb3363321ac
Harvey, Chloe
e69b10a8-85f5-4eeb-9932-4e92a59a097c
Matthews, Zoe
ebaee878-8cb8-415f-8aa1-3af2c3856f55
Raina, Neena
f7d1ec0c-597b-4d55-aec5-930e3615ce46
Tatem, Andrew
6c6de104-a5f9-46e0-bb93-a1a7c980513e

Neal, Sarah, Ruktanonchai, Corrine W., Chandra-Mouli, Venkatraman, Harvey, Chloe, Matthews, Zoe, Raina, Neena and Tatem, Andrew (2019) Using geospatial modelling to estimate the prevalence of adolescent first births in Nepal. BMJ Global Health, 4, [e000763]. (doi:10.1136/bmjgh-2018-000763).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Introduction: Adolescent pregnancy is associated with significant risks and disadvantages for young women and girls and their children. A clear understanding of population subgroups with particularly high prevalence of first births in adolescence is vital if appropriate national responses are to be developed. This paper aims to provide detailed data on socioeconomic and geographic inequities in first births to adolescents in Nepal, including wealth quintile,education, rural/urban residence and geographic region. A key element is the use of geospatial modelling to develop estimates for the prevalence of adolescent births at the district level.
Methods: The study uses data from the 2011 Nepal Demographic and Health Survey. Initial cross-tabulations present disaggregated data by socioeconomic status and basic geographic region. Estimates of prevalence of adolescent first births at the district level are creating by regression modelling using the Integrated Nested Laplace Approximation package in R software.
Results: Our findings show that 40% of women had given birth before the age of 20 years, with 5% giving birth before 16 years. First births to adolescents remain common among poorer, less educated and rural women. Geographic disparities are striking, with estimates for the percentage of women giving birth before 20 years ranging from 35% to 53% by region. District level estimates showed even more marked differentials (26%–67% had given birth by 20 years), with marked heterogeneity even within regions. In some districts, estimates for the prevalence of first birth among the youngest age groups(<16 years) are high.
Conclusion: Important geographic and socioeconomic inequities exist in adolescent first births. In some districts and within some subgroups, there remain high levels of adolescent first births, including births to very young adolescents. The use of Bayesian geospatial modelling techniques can be used by policymakers to target resources.

Text
Nepal clean 24.8 - Accepted Manuscript
Download (90kB)

More information

Submitted date: 19 February 2018
Accepted/In Press date: 27 August 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 1 July 2019
Published date: 1 July 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429126
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429126
ISSN: 2059-7908
PURE UUID: c31601a0-20c5-41b0-91c1-d733e90b44d5
ORCID for Andrew Tatem: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7270-941X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 09 May 2020 04:01

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×