The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Changing epidemiology and challenges of malaria in China towards elimination

Changing epidemiology and challenges of malaria in China towards elimination
Changing epidemiology and challenges of malaria in China towards elimination
Background
Historically, malaria had been a widespread disease in China. A national plan was launched in China in 2010, aiming to eliminate malaria by 2020. In 2017, no indigenous cases of malaria were detected in China for the first time. To provide evidence for precise surveillance and response to achieve elimination goal, a comprehensive study is needed to determine the changing epidemiology of malaria and the challenges towards elimination.

Methods
Using malaria surveillance data from 2011 to 2016, an integrated series of analyses was conducted to elucidate the changing epidemiological features of autochthonous and imported malaria, and the spatiotemporal patterns of malaria importation from endemic countries.

Results
From 2011 to 2016, a total of 21,062 malaria cases with 138 deaths were reported, including 91% were imported and 9% were autochthonous. The geographic distribution of local transmission have shrunk dramatically, but there were still more than 10 counties reporting autochthonous cases in 2013–2016, particularly in counties bordering with countries in South-East Asia. The importation from 68 origins countries had an increasing annual trend from Africa but decreasing importation from Southeast Asia. Four distinct communities have been identified in the importation networks with the destinations in China varied by origin and species.

Conclusions
China is on the verge of malaria elimination, but the residual transmission in border regions and the threats of importation from Africa and Southeast Asia are the key challenges to achieve and maintain malaria elimination. Efforts from China are also needed to help malaria control in origin countries and reduce the risk of introduced transmission.
1475-2875
1-11
Lai, Shengjie
b57a5fe8-cfb6-4fa7-b414-a98bb891b001
Sun, Junling
4f56058d-f603-4758-9b92-873ac36de30f
Ruktanonchai, Nick
fe68cb8d-3760-4955-99fa-47d43f86580a
Zhou, Sheng
937338b3-0c1a-4ddb-9fdb-f2cdb88163a6
Yu, Jianxing
992198dd-6055-4905-ab28-11ced790c57c
Routledge, Isobel
b4aa9e56-7ebe-4ca6-8112-567cf6bcd0ca
Wang, Liping
ef5828b8-d874-42db-bb25-713890281af2
Zheng, Yaming
e3ef516d-f4f3-4f71-9eb2-39d162215b5d
Tatem, Andrew J.
6c6de104-a5f9-46e0-bb93-a1a7c980513e
Li, Zhongjie
f89a98f7-f6d3-4312-995a-bc658ae9a93f
Lai, Shengjie
b57a5fe8-cfb6-4fa7-b414-a98bb891b001
Sun, Junling
4f56058d-f603-4758-9b92-873ac36de30f
Ruktanonchai, Nick
fe68cb8d-3760-4955-99fa-47d43f86580a
Zhou, Sheng
937338b3-0c1a-4ddb-9fdb-f2cdb88163a6
Yu, Jianxing
992198dd-6055-4905-ab28-11ced790c57c
Routledge, Isobel
b4aa9e56-7ebe-4ca6-8112-567cf6bcd0ca
Wang, Liping
ef5828b8-d874-42db-bb25-713890281af2
Zheng, Yaming
e3ef516d-f4f3-4f71-9eb2-39d162215b5d
Tatem, Andrew J.
6c6de104-a5f9-46e0-bb93-a1a7c980513e
Li, Zhongjie
f89a98f7-f6d3-4312-995a-bc658ae9a93f

Lai, Shengjie, Sun, Junling, Ruktanonchai, Nick, Zhou, Sheng, Yu, Jianxing, Routledge, Isobel, Wang, Liping, Zheng, Yaming, Tatem, Andrew J. and Li, Zhongjie (2019) Changing epidemiology and challenges of malaria in China towards elimination. Malaria Journal, 18, 1-11, [107]. (doi:10.1186/s12936-019-2736-8).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background
Historically, malaria had been a widespread disease in China. A national plan was launched in China in 2010, aiming to eliminate malaria by 2020. In 2017, no indigenous cases of malaria were detected in China for the first time. To provide evidence for precise surveillance and response to achieve elimination goal, a comprehensive study is needed to determine the changing epidemiology of malaria and the challenges towards elimination.

Methods
Using malaria surveillance data from 2011 to 2016, an integrated series of analyses was conducted to elucidate the changing epidemiological features of autochthonous and imported malaria, and the spatiotemporal patterns of malaria importation from endemic countries.

Results
From 2011 to 2016, a total of 21,062 malaria cases with 138 deaths were reported, including 91% were imported and 9% were autochthonous. The geographic distribution of local transmission have shrunk dramatically, but there were still more than 10 counties reporting autochthonous cases in 2013–2016, particularly in counties bordering with countries in South-East Asia. The importation from 68 origins countries had an increasing annual trend from Africa but decreasing importation from Southeast Asia. Four distinct communities have been identified in the importation networks with the destinations in China varied by origin and species.

Conclusions
China is on the verge of malaria elimination, but the residual transmission in border regions and the threats of importation from Africa and Southeast Asia are the key challenges to achieve and maintain malaria elimination. Efforts from China are also needed to help malaria control in origin countries and reduce the risk of introduced transmission.

Text
ms_revised_clean - Accepted Manuscript
Download (177kB)
Text
s12936-019-2736-8 - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (16MB)

More information

Submitted date: 20 December 2018
Accepted/In Press date: 18 March 2019
Published date: 29 March 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429305
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429305
ISSN: 1475-2875
PURE UUID: 84a46b5d-c8c8-44bf-bf54-2e8c78788176
ORCID for Shengjie Lai: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9781-8148
ORCID for Andrew J. Tatem: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7270-941X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 05:02

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×