The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

A practical tool for assessing ecosystem services enhancement and degradation associated with invasive alien species

A practical tool for assessing ecosystem services enhancement and degradation associated with invasive alien species
A practical tool for assessing ecosystem services enhancement and degradation associated with invasive alien species
Current approaches for assessing the effects of invasive alien species (IAS) are biased toward the negative effects of these species, resulting in an incomplete picture of their real effects. This can result in an inefficient IAS management. We address this issue by describing the INvasive Species Effects Assessment Tool (INSEAT) that enables expert elicitation for rapidly assessing the ecological consequences of IAS using the ecosystem services (ES) framework. INSEAT scores the ecosystem service “gains and losses” using a scale that accounted for the magnitude and the reversibility of its effects. We tested INSEAT on 18 IAS in Great Britain. Here, we highlighted four case studies: Harmonia axyridis (Harlequin ladybird), Astacus leptodactylus (Turkish crayfish), Pacifastacus leniusculus (Signal crayfish) and Impatiens glandulifera (Himalayan balsam). The results demonstrated that a collation of different experts’ opinions using INSEAT could yield valuable information on the invasive aliens’ ecological and social effects. The users can identify certain IAS as ES providers and the trade‐offs between the ES provision and loss associated with them. This practical tool can be useful for evidence‐based policy and management decisions that consider the potential role of invasive species in delivering human well‐being.
2045-7758
3918-3936
Martinez Cillero, Rocio
5cc921ef-f7a7-4750-be52-8fdf96695469
Willcock, Simon
89d9767e-8076-4b21-be9d-a964f5cc85d7
Perez-Diaz, Alvaro
dc83bca5-5108-4448-878f-23e73dec4c88
Joslin, Emma
28b032eb-0812-414f-b4cb-7cd6515adff5
Vergeer, Philippine
219014bd-8be5-4ff7-b31c-fc737bb2dcdc
Peh, Kelvin S.-H.
0bd60207-dad8-43fb-a84a-a15e09b024cc
Martinez Cillero, Rocio
5cc921ef-f7a7-4750-be52-8fdf96695469
Willcock, Simon
89d9767e-8076-4b21-be9d-a964f5cc85d7
Perez-Diaz, Alvaro
dc83bca5-5108-4448-878f-23e73dec4c88
Joslin, Emma
28b032eb-0812-414f-b4cb-7cd6515adff5
Vergeer, Philippine
219014bd-8be5-4ff7-b31c-fc737bb2dcdc
Peh, Kelvin S.-H.
0bd60207-dad8-43fb-a84a-a15e09b024cc

Martinez Cillero, Rocio, Willcock, Simon, Perez-Diaz, Alvaro, Joslin, Emma, Vergeer, Philippine and Peh, Kelvin S.-H. (2019) A practical tool for assessing ecosystem services enhancement and degradation associated with invasive alien species. Ecology and Evolution, 9 (7), 3918-3936. (doi:10.1002/ece3.5020).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Current approaches for assessing the effects of invasive alien species (IAS) are biased toward the negative effects of these species, resulting in an incomplete picture of their real effects. This can result in an inefficient IAS management. We address this issue by describing the INvasive Species Effects Assessment Tool (INSEAT) that enables expert elicitation for rapidly assessing the ecological consequences of IAS using the ecosystem services (ES) framework. INSEAT scores the ecosystem service “gains and losses” using a scale that accounted for the magnitude and the reversibility of its effects. We tested INSEAT on 18 IAS in Great Britain. Here, we highlighted four case studies: Harmonia axyridis (Harlequin ladybird), Astacus leptodactylus (Turkish crayfish), Pacifastacus leniusculus (Signal crayfish) and Impatiens glandulifera (Himalayan balsam). The results demonstrated that a collation of different experts’ opinions using INSEAT could yield valuable information on the invasive aliens’ ecological and social effects. The users can identify certain IAS as ES providers and the trade‐offs between the ES provision and loss associated with them. This practical tool can be useful for evidence‐based policy and management decisions that consider the potential role of invasive species in delivering human well‐being.

Text
Submitted version_Ecology and Evolution - Accepted Manuscript
Download (566kB)
Text
Martinez-Cillero et al 2019 Ecology and Evolution - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (905kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 8 February 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 27 March 2019
Published date: April 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429362
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429362
ISSN: 2045-7758
PURE UUID: 828118c6-55e2-4715-9ebb-894326f7c9e4
ORCID for Alvaro Perez-Diaz: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8081-0772
ORCID for Kelvin S.-H. Peh: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2921-1341

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 14 May 2019 00:31

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Rocio Martinez Cillero
Author: Simon Willcock
Author: Alvaro Perez-Diaz ORCID iD
Author: Emma Joslin
Author: Philippine Vergeer

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×