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Prevalence and correlates of diabetes and its comorbidities in four Gulf Cooperation Council countries: evidence from the World Health Survey Plus

Prevalence and correlates of diabetes and its comorbidities in four Gulf Cooperation Council countries: evidence from the World Health Survey Plus
Prevalence and correlates of diabetes and its comorbidities in four Gulf Cooperation Council countries: evidence from the World Health Survey Plus
Background: The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries are witnessing unprecedented changes due to fast economic development and population growth. The aims of this study were two-fold: firstly to estimate the prevalence of diabetes and its comorbidities. Second, to examine the association of socio-demographic risk factors and healthcare service utilization with diabetes.

Methods: Data from the World Health Survey Plus (WHS+) from Kuwait, Oman, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates were used. The WHS+ is a nationally representative household survey of the adult population, conducted between 2008 and 2009. Both logistic regression and zero-inflated Poisson models were applied to examine associations of risk factors, comorbidity and treatment with self-reported diabetes.

Results: The highest level of diabetes was observed in Kuwait, with 40.8% amongst the oldest age group. High BMI, older age and low education were all associated with diabetes in all settings. High levels of comorbidity existed within the diabetic population. Over 50% of diabetics in all countries reported having at least one chronic condition. In Kuwait and Saudi Arabia one in five diabetics reported having two or more co-morbidities. Treatment prevalence was above 80% across all socio-demographic categories.

Conclusion: The burden of diabetes, although high, is not uniform across populations in the four Gulf countries. Differential exposure to risk, such as unhealthy lifestyles, may be creating a disadvantage for certain populations and influencing the co-occurrence of chronic conditions. In response, a multifaceted and patient-centred approach is needed at all levels of health care to control and prevent non-communicable diseases.
0143-005X
1-7
Afshar Morgan, Sara
8ad10b7e-2005-4e93-9948-164a69489350
Ali, Mohamed M.
0bcbb789-e5ee-4e5f-8730-22cc402d4745
Channon, Andrew
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Al Sabahi, Sultana
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Al Suwaidi, Huda
ac8677a1-f393-498d-b1a6-91dc15026ce3
Osman, Nabil
89de7631-a7d0-466f-8ec9-064d27e19eb3
Al-Salamin, Mustafa Ayesh
8bf220c1-9fc9-4733-ada7-3522915633bc
Khoja, Tawfik A.M.
e5cb7f2b-d6cf-4c23-b369-8459cedc7c2a
Afshar Morgan, Sara
8ad10b7e-2005-4e93-9948-164a69489350
Ali, Mohamed M.
0bcbb789-e5ee-4e5f-8730-22cc402d4745
Channon, Andrew
5a60607c-6861-4960-a81d-504169d5880c
Al Sabahi, Sultana
73bc78f5-fac1-481e-8e3c-456b7203b94c
Al Suwaidi, Huda
ac8677a1-f393-498d-b1a6-91dc15026ce3
Osman, Nabil
89de7631-a7d0-466f-8ec9-064d27e19eb3
Al-Salamin, Mustafa Ayesh
8bf220c1-9fc9-4733-ada7-3522915633bc
Khoja, Tawfik A.M.
e5cb7f2b-d6cf-4c23-b369-8459cedc7c2a

Afshar Morgan, Sara, Ali, Mohamed M., Channon, Andrew, Al Sabahi, Sultana, Al Suwaidi, Huda, Osman, Nabil, Al-Salamin, Mustafa Ayesh and Khoja, Tawfik A.M. (2019) Prevalence and correlates of diabetes and its comorbidities in four Gulf Cooperation Council countries: evidence from the World Health Survey Plus. Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, 1-7. (doi:10.1136/jech-2018-211187).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries are witnessing unprecedented changes due to fast economic development and population growth. The aims of this study were two-fold: firstly to estimate the prevalence of diabetes and its comorbidities. Second, to examine the association of socio-demographic risk factors and healthcare service utilization with diabetes.

Methods: Data from the World Health Survey Plus (WHS+) from Kuwait, Oman, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates were used. The WHS+ is a nationally representative household survey of the adult population, conducted between 2008 and 2009. Both logistic regression and zero-inflated Poisson models were applied to examine associations of risk factors, comorbidity and treatment with self-reported diabetes.

Results: The highest level of diabetes was observed in Kuwait, with 40.8% amongst the oldest age group. High BMI, older age and low education were all associated with diabetes in all settings. High levels of comorbidity existed within the diabetic population. Over 50% of diabetics in all countries reported having at least one chronic condition. In Kuwait and Saudi Arabia one in five diabetics reported having two or more co-morbidities. Treatment prevalence was above 80% across all socio-demographic categories.

Conclusion: The burden of diabetes, although high, is not uniform across populations in the four Gulf countries. Differential exposure to risk, such as unhealthy lifestyles, may be creating a disadvantage for certain populations and influencing the co-occurrence of chronic conditions. In response, a multifaceted and patient-centred approach is needed at all levels of health care to control and prevent non-communicable diseases.

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Accepted/In Press date: 19 February 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 20 March 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429578
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429578
ISSN: 0143-005X
PURE UUID: 9f4dfded-9de1-4403-9593-ef96c96b3e6b
ORCID for Andrew Channon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4855-0418

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Date deposited: 29 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 24 Jul 2019 00:35

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Contributors

Author: Mohamed M. Ali
Author: Andrew Channon ORCID iD
Author: Sultana Al Sabahi
Author: Huda Al Suwaidi
Author: Nabil Osman
Author: Mustafa Ayesh Al-Salamin
Author: Tawfik A.M. Khoja

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