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Policing the beats: The criminalisation of UK drill and grime music by the London Metropolitan Police

Policing the beats: The criminalisation of UK drill and grime music by the London Metropolitan Police
Policing the beats: The criminalisation of UK drill and grime music by the London Metropolitan Police
As debates on the rise of violent crime in London unfold, UK drill music is routinely accused of encouraging criminal behaviour among young Black Britons from deprived areas of the capital. Following a series of bans against drill music videos and the imposition of Criminal Behaviour Orders and gang injunctions against drill artists, discussions on the defensibility of such measures call for urgent, yet hitherto absent, sociological reflections on a topical issue. This article attempts to fill this gap, by demonstrating how UK drill and earlier Black music genres, like grime, have been criminalised and policed in ways that question the legitimacy of and reveal the discriminatory nature of policing young Black people by the London Metropolitan Police as the coercive arm of the British state. Drawing on the concept of racial neoliberalism the policing of drill will be approached theoretically as an expression of the discriminatory politics that neoliberal economics facilitates in order to exclude those who the state deems undesirable or underserving of its protection.
0038-0261
Fatsis, Lambros
63a998a9-b921-43c3-a7aa-d765467a23f1
Fatsis, Lambros
63a998a9-b921-43c3-a7aa-d765467a23f1

Fatsis, Lambros (2019) Policing the beats: The criminalisation of UK drill and grime music by the London Metropolitan Police. The Sociological Review. (doi:10.1177/0038026119842480).

Record type: Article

Abstract

As debates on the rise of violent crime in London unfold, UK drill music is routinely accused of encouraging criminal behaviour among young Black Britons from deprived areas of the capital. Following a series of bans against drill music videos and the imposition of Criminal Behaviour Orders and gang injunctions against drill artists, discussions on the defensibility of such measures call for urgent, yet hitherto absent, sociological reflections on a topical issue. This article attempts to fill this gap, by demonstrating how UK drill and earlier Black music genres, like grime, have been criminalised and policed in ways that question the legitimacy of and reveal the discriminatory nature of policing young Black people by the London Metropolitan Police as the coercive arm of the British state. Drawing on the concept of racial neoliberalism the policing of drill will be approached theoretically as an expression of the discriminatory politics that neoliberal economics facilitates in order to exclude those who the state deems undesirable or underserving of its protection.

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Policing the Beats - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 5 April 2020.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 14 March 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 5 April 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429705
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429705
ISSN: 0038-0261
PURE UUID: abc40330-f30f-48c5-bd5a-d436f8a901a2

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Date deposited: 04 Apr 2019 16:30
Last modified: 08 Apr 2019 16:30

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Author: Lambros Fatsis

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