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Attitudes of pregnant women and healthcare professionals towards clinical trials and routine implementation of antenatal vaccination against respiratory syncytial virus: a multi-centre questionnaire study

Attitudes of pregnant women and healthcare professionals towards clinical trials and routine implementation of antenatal vaccination against respiratory syncytial virus: a multi-centre questionnaire study
Attitudes of pregnant women and healthcare professionals towards clinical trials and routine implementation of antenatal vaccination against respiratory syncytial virus: a multi-centre questionnaire study


Introduction: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common cause of infant hospitalization and mortality. With multiple vaccines in development, we aimed to determine: (1) the awareness of RSV among pregnant women and healthcare professionals (HCPs), and (2) attitudes toward clinical trials and routine implementation of antenatal RSV vaccination.

Methods: Separate questionnaires for pregnant women and HCPs were distributed within 4 hospitals in South England (July 2017–January 2018).

Results: Responses from 314 pregnant women and 204 HCPs (18% obstetricians, 75% midwives, 7% unknown) were analyzed. Most pregnant women (88%) and midwives (66%) had no/very little awareness of RSV, unlike obstetricians (14%). Among pregnant women, 29% and 75% would likely accept RSV vaccination as part of a trial, or if routinely recommended, respectively. Younger women (16–24 years), those of 21–30 weeks’ gestation, and with experience of RSV were significantly more likely to participate in trials [odds ratio (OR): 1.42 (1.72–9.86); OR: 2.29 (1.22–4.31); OR: 9.07 (1.62–50.86), respectively]. White-British women and those of 21–30 weeks’ gestation were more likely to accept routinely recommended vaccination [OR: 2.16 (1.07–4.13); OR: 2.10 (1.07–4.13)]. Obstetricians were more likely than midwives to support clinical trials [92% vs. 68%, OR: 2.50 (1.01–6.16)] and routine RSV vaccination [89% vs. 79%, OR: 4.08 (1.53–9.81)], as were those with prior knowledge of RSV, and who deemed it serious.

Conclusions: RSV awareness is low among pregnant women and midwives. Education will be required to support successful implementation of routine antenatal vaccination. Research is needed to understand reasons for vaccine hesitancy among pregnant women and HCPs, particularly midwives.
0891-3668
944-951
Wilcox, Christopher R.
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Calvert, Anna
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Metz, Jane
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Kilich, Eliz
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MacLeod, Rachael
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Beadon, Kirsten
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Heath, Paul T.
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Khalil, Asma
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Finn, Adam
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Snape, Matthew D.
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Vandrevala, Tushna
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Nadarzynski, Tom
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Coleman, Matthew A.
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Jones, Christine E.
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Wilcox, Christopher R.
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Calvert, Anna
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Metz, Jane
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Kilich, Eliz
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MacLeod, Rachael
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Beadon, Kirsten
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Heath, Paul T.
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Khalil, Asma
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Finn, Adam
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Snape, Matthew D.
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Vandrevala, Tushna
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Nadarzynski, Tom
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Coleman, Matthew A.
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Jones, Christine E.
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Wilcox, Christopher R., Calvert, Anna, Metz, Jane, Kilich, Eliz, MacLeod, Rachael, Beadon, Kirsten, Heath, Paul T., Khalil, Asma, Finn, Adam, Snape, Matthew D., Vandrevala, Tushna, Nadarzynski, Tom, Coleman, Matthew A. and Jones, Christine E. (2019) Attitudes of pregnant women and healthcare professionals towards clinical trials and routine implementation of antenatal vaccination against respiratory syncytial virus: a multi-centre questionnaire study. Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 38 (9), 944-951. (doi:10.1097/INF.0000000000002384).

Record type: Article

Abstract



Introduction: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common cause of infant hospitalization and mortality. With multiple vaccines in development, we aimed to determine: (1) the awareness of RSV among pregnant women and healthcare professionals (HCPs), and (2) attitudes toward clinical trials and routine implementation of antenatal RSV vaccination.

Methods: Separate questionnaires for pregnant women and HCPs were distributed within 4 hospitals in South England (July 2017–January 2018).

Results: Responses from 314 pregnant women and 204 HCPs (18% obstetricians, 75% midwives, 7% unknown) were analyzed. Most pregnant women (88%) and midwives (66%) had no/very little awareness of RSV, unlike obstetricians (14%). Among pregnant women, 29% and 75% would likely accept RSV vaccination as part of a trial, or if routinely recommended, respectively. Younger women (16–24 years), those of 21–30 weeks’ gestation, and with experience of RSV were significantly more likely to participate in trials [odds ratio (OR): 1.42 (1.72–9.86); OR: 2.29 (1.22–4.31); OR: 9.07 (1.62–50.86), respectively]. White-British women and those of 21–30 weeks’ gestation were more likely to accept routinely recommended vaccination [OR: 2.16 (1.07–4.13); OR: 2.10 (1.07–4.13)]. Obstetricians were more likely than midwives to support clinical trials [92% vs. 68%, OR: 2.50 (1.01–6.16)] and routine RSV vaccination [89% vs. 79%, OR: 4.08 (1.53–9.81)], as were those with prior knowledge of RSV, and who deemed it serious.

Conclusions: RSV awareness is low among pregnant women and midwives. Education will be required to support successful implementation of routine antenatal vaccination. Research is needed to understand reasons for vaccine hesitancy among pregnant women and HCPs, particularly midwives.

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Accepted/In Press date: 24 April 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 3 July 2019
Published date: 1 September 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 430451
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/430451
ISSN: 0891-3668
PURE UUID: 196a285c-0521-4b1f-aa50-1ea0f034a9ab
ORCID for Christine E. Jones: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1523-2368

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Date deposited: 01 May 2019 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 05:40

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Contributors

Author: Anna Calvert
Author: Jane Metz
Author: Eliz Kilich
Author: Rachael MacLeod
Author: Kirsten Beadon
Author: Paul T. Heath
Author: Asma Khalil
Author: Adam Finn
Author: Matthew D. Snape
Author: Tushna Vandrevala
Author: Tom Nadarzynski
Author: Matthew A. Coleman

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