The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Prenatal influences on bone health in children

Prenatal influences on bone health in children
Prenatal influences on bone health in children
Introduction: Optimising bone health might reduce the burden of both fractures in childhood and fragility fractures in later life. A number of maternal dietary and non-dietary factors have been identified that might influence offspring bone health and represent targets for intervention.

Areas covered: This article will outline the accrual of bone mineral throughout the life course and how observational and intervention studies have shown that maternal diet, in particular maternal calcium and 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] status, and lifestyle are associated with offspring bone mineralization. Studies examining the effects of maternal micronutrient supplementation on offspring bone mineral density (BMD) will also be discussed.

Expert commentary: There is a wealth of observational evidence relating maternal diet to offspring BMD. However, high quality randomized controlled trials, such as the ongoing MAVIDOS study, are needed before these findings can be definitively translated into public health advice.
193-202
Woolford, Stephen J.
a123d451-d086-45c0-a961-8704f5e90c90
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Harvey, Nicholas
ce487fb4-d360-4aac-9d17-9466d6cba145
Moon, Rebecca J.
954fb3ed-9934-4649-886d-f65944985a6b
Woolford, Stephen J.
a123d451-d086-45c0-a961-8704f5e90c90
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Harvey, Nicholas
ce487fb4-d360-4aac-9d17-9466d6cba145
Moon, Rebecca J.
954fb3ed-9934-4649-886d-f65944985a6b

Woolford, Stephen J., Cooper, Cyrus, Harvey, Nicholas and Moon, Rebecca J. (2019) Prenatal influences on bone health in children. Expert Review of Endocrinology & Metabolism, 14 (3), 193-202. (doi:10.1080/17446651.2019.1607727).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Introduction: Optimising bone health might reduce the burden of both fractures in childhood and fragility fractures in later life. A number of maternal dietary and non-dietary factors have been identified that might influence offspring bone health and represent targets for intervention.

Areas covered: This article will outline the accrual of bone mineral throughout the life course and how observational and intervention studies have shown that maternal diet, in particular maternal calcium and 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] status, and lifestyle are associated with offspring bone mineralization. Studies examining the effects of maternal micronutrient supplementation on offspring bone mineral density (BMD) will also be discussed.

Expert commentary: There is a wealth of observational evidence relating maternal diet to offspring BMD. However, high quality randomized controlled trials, such as the ongoing MAVIDOS study, are needed before these findings can be definitively translated into public health advice.

Text
Prenatal influences on bone health in children revision no endnote codes - Accepted Manuscript
Download (45kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 11 April 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 April 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 430644
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/430644
PURE UUID: 5660ccd8-0d34-4698-8160-6ff8ba3a7d3c
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for Nicholas Harvey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8194-2512

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 May 2019 16:30
Last modified: 22 Nov 2021 07:21

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Stephen J. Woolford
Author: Cyrus Cooper ORCID iD
Author: Nicholas Harvey ORCID iD
Author: Rebecca J. Moon

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×