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The role of collective efficacy In long-term condition management: a metasynthesis

The role of collective efficacy In long-term condition management: a metasynthesis
The role of collective efficacy In long-term condition management: a metasynthesis
Social networks have been found to have a valuable role in supporting the management of long-term conditions. However, the focus on the quality and how well self-management interventions work focus on indivdualised behavioural outcomes such as self-efficacy and there is a need for understanding that focuses on the role of wider collective processes in self-management support. Collective efficacy presents a potentially useful candidate concept in the development and understanding of self-management support interventions. To date it has mainly been utilised in the context of organisations and neighbourhoods related to social phenomena such as community cohesion. Drawing on Bandura’s original theorisation this meta-synthesis explores how studies of collective efficacy might illuminate collective elements operating within the personal communities of people with long-term conditions.
A qualitative meta-synthesis was undertaken. Studies published between 1998 and 2018 that examined collective efficacy in relation to health and wellbeing using qualitative and mixed methods were eligible for inclusion. Timing of engagement with others, building trust in the group, and legitimising ongoing engagement with the group arised as central elements of collective efficacy. The two themes forming 3rd order constructs were related to the presence of continuous interaction and on-going relational work between members of the group. Collective efficacy can develop and be sustained over time in a range of situations where individuals may not have intense relationships with one another and have limited commitment and contact with one another. Extending this to the personal communities of people with long-term conditions it may be the case that collective efficacy enables a number of engagement opportunities which can be oriented towards assisting with support from networks over a sustained length of time. This may include negotiating acceptable connections to resources and activities which in turn may help change existing practice in ways that improve long-term condition management.
0966-0410
Vassilev, Ivaylo
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Band, Rebecca
be8901bb-bb1b-4131-8e19-c1d4a3bdfb8d
Kennedy, Anne
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James, Elizabeth
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Rogers, Anne
105eeebc-1899-4850-950e-385a51738eb7
Vassilev, Ivaylo
d76a5531-4ddc-4eb2-909b-a2a1068f05f3
Band, Rebecca
be8901bb-bb1b-4131-8e19-c1d4a3bdfb8d
Kennedy, Anne
e059c1c7-d6d0-41c8-95e1-95e5273b07f8
James, Elizabeth
b7e90b5a-da45-4459-ae84-150adc07e988
Rogers, Anne
105eeebc-1899-4850-950e-385a51738eb7

Vassilev, Ivaylo, Band, Rebecca, Kennedy, Anne, James, Elizabeth and Rogers, Anne (2019) The role of collective efficacy In long-term condition management: a metasynthesis. Health and Social Care in the Community. (doi:10.1111/hsc.12779).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Social networks have been found to have a valuable role in supporting the management of long-term conditions. However, the focus on the quality and how well self-management interventions work focus on indivdualised behavioural outcomes such as self-efficacy and there is a need for understanding that focuses on the role of wider collective processes in self-management support. Collective efficacy presents a potentially useful candidate concept in the development and understanding of self-management support interventions. To date it has mainly been utilised in the context of organisations and neighbourhoods related to social phenomena such as community cohesion. Drawing on Bandura’s original theorisation this meta-synthesis explores how studies of collective efficacy might illuminate collective elements operating within the personal communities of people with long-term conditions.
A qualitative meta-synthesis was undertaken. Studies published between 1998 and 2018 that examined collective efficacy in relation to health and wellbeing using qualitative and mixed methods were eligible for inclusion. Timing of engagement with others, building trust in the group, and legitimising ongoing engagement with the group arised as central elements of collective efficacy. The two themes forming 3rd order constructs were related to the presence of continuous interaction and on-going relational work between members of the group. Collective efficacy can develop and be sustained over time in a range of situations where individuals may not have intense relationships with one another and have limited commitment and contact with one another. Extending this to the personal communities of people with long-term conditions it may be the case that collective efficacy enables a number of engagement opportunities which can be oriented towards assisting with support from networks over a sustained length of time. This may include negotiating acceptable connections to resources and activities which in turn may help change existing practice in ways that improve long-term condition management.

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The Role of Collective Efficacy In Long-Term Condition Management: A Metasynthesis - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 12 April 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 24 June 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 430828
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/430828
ISSN: 0966-0410
PURE UUID: a7b4cf3b-a2a3-4f4e-982c-e5af9ff3ac19
ORCID for Rebecca Band: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5403-1708
ORCID for Anne Kennedy: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4570-9104
ORCID for Elizabeth James: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9355-0295

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Date deposited: 15 May 2019 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 04:34

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Contributors

Author: Ivaylo Vassilev
Author: Rebecca Band ORCID iD
Author: Anne Kennedy ORCID iD
Author: Elizabeth James ORCID iD
Author: Anne Rogers

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