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Serotype distribution of disease-causing Streptococcus pneumoniae in Thailand: A systematic review

Serotype distribution of disease-causing Streptococcus pneumoniae in Thailand: A systematic review
Serotype distribution of disease-causing Streptococcus pneumoniae in Thailand: A systematic review
Background Streptococcus pneumoniae infection is associated with a high morbidity and mortality worldwide. There are currently >98 known serotypes; the most burdensome are covered by current pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) such as PCV10 (Synflorix®) and (Prevnar 13®) PCV13. However, at present no PCV is available on the National Expanded Programme of Immunization (EPI) in Thailand. Methods Here we report a systematic review of studies regarding pneumococci associated with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and non-IPD in Thailand. The NCBI PubMed database and Google Scholar were used to identify relevant papers published from 1st January 1990 to 21st August 2017. The quantitative analysis was reported as the distribution of serotypes across two age groups, ≤5 and >5 years old, as these were the most commonly reported. Where age was not stated, or data was combined, data were categorised as all ages. Results The search returned 15 relevant articles. From these the five most common disease-causing serotypes, in rank order, were 6B, 23F, 14, 19A and 19F. Vaccine coverage would be 55.3% for PCV10 and 69.7% for PCV13. There was insufficient data to draw conclusions regarding non-invasive disease-causing pneumococcal serotypes. Conclusion This review demonstrates that the serotypes which were most responsible for disease in Thailand are included in PCV10 and PCV13. Better surveillance data of IPD and non-IPD are required for monitoring vaccine effectiveness if PCV is implemented nationally.
Invasive pneumococcal disease, IPD, non-IPD, Pneumococcus, Thailand, Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine
0264-410X
3159-3166
Hocknell, Rebecca
42441e39-fd24-42b2-80e5-f5ddd4588f6d
Cleary, David
f4079c6d-d54b-4108-b346-b0069035bec0
Srifeungfung, Somporn
49557dfe-31b4-4499-ace5-ce7baa68c01b
Clarke, Stuart
f7d7f7a2-4b1f-4b36-883a-0f967e73fb17
Hocknell, Rebecca
42441e39-fd24-42b2-80e5-f5ddd4588f6d
Cleary, David
f4079c6d-d54b-4108-b346-b0069035bec0
Srifeungfung, Somporn
49557dfe-31b4-4499-ace5-ce7baa68c01b
Clarke, Stuart
f7d7f7a2-4b1f-4b36-883a-0f967e73fb17

Hocknell, Rebecca, Cleary, David, Srifeungfung, Somporn and Clarke, Stuart (2019) Serotype distribution of disease-causing Streptococcus pneumoniae in Thailand: A systematic review. Vaccine, 37 (24), 3159-3166. (doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2019.04.085).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background Streptococcus pneumoniae infection is associated with a high morbidity and mortality worldwide. There are currently >98 known serotypes; the most burdensome are covered by current pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) such as PCV10 (Synflorix®) and (Prevnar 13®) PCV13. However, at present no PCV is available on the National Expanded Programme of Immunization (EPI) in Thailand. Methods Here we report a systematic review of studies regarding pneumococci associated with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and non-IPD in Thailand. The NCBI PubMed database and Google Scholar were used to identify relevant papers published from 1st January 1990 to 21st August 2017. The quantitative analysis was reported as the distribution of serotypes across two age groups, ≤5 and >5 years old, as these were the most commonly reported. Where age was not stated, or data was combined, data were categorised as all ages. Results The search returned 15 relevant articles. From these the five most common disease-causing serotypes, in rank order, were 6B, 23F, 14, 19A and 19F. Vaccine coverage would be 55.3% for PCV10 and 69.7% for PCV13. There was insufficient data to draw conclusions regarding non-invasive disease-causing pneumococcal serotypes. Conclusion This review demonstrates that the serotypes which were most responsible for disease in Thailand are included in PCV10 and PCV13. Better surveillance data of IPD and non-IPD are required for monitoring vaccine effectiveness if PCV is implemented nationally.

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Pneumococcal Literature Review Manuscript - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 25 April 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 3 May 2019
Published date: 27 May 2019
Keywords: Invasive pneumococcal disease, IPD, non-IPD, Pneumococcus, Thailand, Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 431063
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/431063
ISSN: 0264-410X
PURE UUID: e4b7791b-0cbb-41da-843d-68f511331b79
ORCID for David Cleary: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4533-0700
ORCID for Stuart Clarke: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7009-1548

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 May 2019 16:30
Last modified: 22 Nov 2021 07:23

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Contributors

Author: Rebecca Hocknell
Author: David Cleary ORCID iD
Author: Somporn Srifeungfung
Author: Stuart Clarke ORCID iD

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