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Vitamin D, and maternal and child health

Vitamin D, and maternal and child health
Vitamin D, and maternal and child health
Vitamin D has important roles in calcium metabolism and the prevention of rickets and osteomalacia; low levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D are common in general population and amongst pregnant women. Whilst there is a wealth of observational evidence linking vitamin D deficiency to a wide range of disease outcomes, there are currently few high quality randomised controlled trials to confirm any causal associations, although many are currently in progress. Furthermore, currently, the vast majority of published guidelines recommend standard supplemental vitamin D doses for children and pregnant women, yet there is increasing recognition that individual characteristics and genetic factors may influence the response to supplementation. As such, future research needs to concentrate on documenting definite beneficial clinical outcomes of vitamin D supplementation, and establishing personalised dosing schedules and demonstrating effective approaches to optimizing initiation and adherence.
0171-967X
1-17
Moon, Rebecca
954fb3ed-9934-4649-886d-f65944985a6b
Davies, Justin H
9f18fcad-f488-4c72-ac23-c154995443a9
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Harvey, Nicholas
ce487fb4-d360-4aac-9d17-9466d6cba145
Moon, Rebecca
954fb3ed-9934-4649-886d-f65944985a6b
Davies, Justin H
9f18fcad-f488-4c72-ac23-c154995443a9
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Harvey, Nicholas
ce487fb4-d360-4aac-9d17-9466d6cba145

Moon, Rebecca, Davies, Justin H, Cooper, Cyrus and Harvey, Nicholas (2019) Vitamin D, and maternal and child health. Calcified Tissue International, 1-17. (doi:10.1007/s00223-019-00560-x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Vitamin D has important roles in calcium metabolism and the prevention of rickets and osteomalacia; low levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D are common in general population and amongst pregnant women. Whilst there is a wealth of observational evidence linking vitamin D deficiency to a wide range of disease outcomes, there are currently few high quality randomised controlled trials to confirm any causal associations, although many are currently in progress. Furthermore, currently, the vast majority of published guidelines recommend standard supplemental vitamin D doses for children and pregnant women, yet there is increasing recognition that individual characteristics and genetic factors may influence the response to supplementation. As such, future research needs to concentrate on documenting definite beneficial clinical outcomes of vitamin D supplementation, and establishing personalised dosing schedules and demonstrating effective approaches to optimizing initiation and adherence.

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RM vit D mat child health CTI 03_10_2018 - Accepted Manuscript
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Moon 2019 Article Vitamin D And Maternal And Child Health - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 29 April 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 14 May 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 431234
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/431234
ISSN: 0171-967X
PURE UUID: c6088935-3cd1-4666-a2c8-9e26e959b23c
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for Nicholas Harvey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8194-2512

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 May 2019 16:30
Last modified: 22 Nov 2021 07:24

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Contributors

Author: Rebecca Moon
Author: Justin H Davies
Author: Cyrus Cooper ORCID iD
Author: Nicholas Harvey ORCID iD

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