The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Electroceutical treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

Electroceutical treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms
Electroceutical treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms
Electroceutical wound dressings, especially those involving current flow with silver based electrodes, show promise for treating biofilm infections. However, their mechanism of action is poorly understood. We have developed an in vitro agar based model using a bioluminescent strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to measure loss of activity and killing when direct current was applied. Silver electrodes were overlaid with agar and lawn biofilms grown for 24h. A 6V battery with 1kΩ ballast resistor was used to treat the biofilms for 1h or 24h. Loss of bioluminescence and a 4-log reduction in viable cells was achieved over the anode. Scanning electron microscopy showed damaged cells and disrupted biofilm architecture. The antimicrobial activity continued to spread from the anode for at least 2 days, even after turning off the current. Elemental analysis using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopic (EDS) analysis through the agar suggests that silver was not responsible for the observed killing. Electrochemistry of silver electrodes in aqueous solutions containing chlorine, pH measurements, the time delay between when the cidal agent is produced and when adverse impact on the biofilm is observed, and chlorotyrosine in the lysates, all suggest that hypochlorous acid was a likely agent in the destruction of these biofilm forming bacteria. Similar killing was obtained with gels containing only bovine synovial fluid or human serum. These results suggest that our in vitro model could serve as a platform for fundamental studies to explore the effects of electrochemical treatment on biofilms, complementing clinical studies with electroceutical dressings.
biofilm, agar, zone of inhibition, electroceutical, direct current, wound dressing, Pseudomonas
2045-2322
Dusane, Devendra H.
9a47c5eb-5587-4f1d-bfd4-8548681be2bc
Lochab, Varun
64ab1066-34f4-4bea-b8e9-089d0014c02c
Jones, Travis
c2e4ba02-4f53-4faf-8ca2-c5f7514cb6ae
Peters, Casey W.
7c4253bd-aa41-42f3-a253-9da8bd3acb13
Sindeldecker, Devin
53899a0e-6c67-40e4-813d-ce3e907f3ee8
Das, Amitava
912a450f-827c-44bd-8e01-3355d6516d79
Roy, Sashwati
d4a9320f-de96-4114-b6b3-f408a487e0d5
Sen, Chandan K.
e1489d08-11b1-43a0-aed0-af27f5fa0ebe
Subramaniam, Vish V.
b91405c4-c945-4342-b06a-a5ef8e69aba4
Wozniak, Daniel J.
bfa8e8e5-5929-449b-af6a-ec2d86c47eb5
Prakash, Shaurya
54775442-9f96-4129-b93d-082a5ff91d9b
Stoodley, Paul
08614665-92a9-4466-806e-20c6daeb483f
Dusane, Devendra H.
9a47c5eb-5587-4f1d-bfd4-8548681be2bc
Lochab, Varun
64ab1066-34f4-4bea-b8e9-089d0014c02c
Jones, Travis
c2e4ba02-4f53-4faf-8ca2-c5f7514cb6ae
Peters, Casey W.
7c4253bd-aa41-42f3-a253-9da8bd3acb13
Sindeldecker, Devin
53899a0e-6c67-40e4-813d-ce3e907f3ee8
Das, Amitava
912a450f-827c-44bd-8e01-3355d6516d79
Roy, Sashwati
d4a9320f-de96-4114-b6b3-f408a487e0d5
Sen, Chandan K.
e1489d08-11b1-43a0-aed0-af27f5fa0ebe
Subramaniam, Vish V.
b91405c4-c945-4342-b06a-a5ef8e69aba4
Wozniak, Daniel J.
bfa8e8e5-5929-449b-af6a-ec2d86c47eb5
Prakash, Shaurya
54775442-9f96-4129-b93d-082a5ff91d9b
Stoodley, Paul
08614665-92a9-4466-806e-20c6daeb483f

Dusane, Devendra H., Lochab, Varun, Jones, Travis, Peters, Casey W., Sindeldecker, Devin, Das, Amitava, Roy, Sashwati, Sen, Chandan K., Subramaniam, Vish V., Wozniak, Daniel J., Prakash, Shaurya and Stoodley, Paul (2019) Electroceutical treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Scientific Reports, 9 (1), [2008]. (doi:10.1038/s41598-018-37891-y).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Electroceutical wound dressings, especially those involving current flow with silver based electrodes, show promise for treating biofilm infections. However, their mechanism of action is poorly understood. We have developed an in vitro agar based model using a bioluminescent strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to measure loss of activity and killing when direct current was applied. Silver electrodes were overlaid with agar and lawn biofilms grown for 24h. A 6V battery with 1kΩ ballast resistor was used to treat the biofilms for 1h or 24h. Loss of bioluminescence and a 4-log reduction in viable cells was achieved over the anode. Scanning electron microscopy showed damaged cells and disrupted biofilm architecture. The antimicrobial activity continued to spread from the anode for at least 2 days, even after turning off the current. Elemental analysis using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopic (EDS) analysis through the agar suggests that silver was not responsible for the observed killing. Electrochemistry of silver electrodes in aqueous solutions containing chlorine, pH measurements, the time delay between when the cidal agent is produced and when adverse impact on the biofilm is observed, and chlorotyrosine in the lysates, all suggest that hypochlorous acid was a likely agent in the destruction of these biofilm forming bacteria. Similar killing was obtained with gels containing only bovine synovial fluid or human serum. These results suggest that our in vitro model could serve as a platform for fundamental studies to explore the effects of electrochemical treatment on biofilms, complementing clinical studies with electroceutical dressings.

Text
Dusane et al. 2018-Sci Rep-Main Article - Accepted Manuscript
Download (4MB)
Text
s41598-018-37891-y - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (2MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 30 November 2018
Published date: 14 February 2019
Keywords: biofilm, agar, zone of inhibition, electroceutical, direct current, wound dressing, Pseudomonas

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 431601
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/431601
ISSN: 2045-2322
PURE UUID: ef4beb31-55ae-44b6-8740-1520a4b0b20e
ORCID for Paul Stoodley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6069-273X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Jun 2019 16:31
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 06:33

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×