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Integrating flexible filament circuits for e‐textile applications

Integrating flexible filament circuits for e‐textile applications
Integrating flexible filament circuits for e‐textile applications
Practical wearable e‐textiles must be durable and retain, as far as possible, the textile properties such as drape, feel, lightweight, breathability, and washability that make fabrics suitable for clothing. Early e‐textile garments were realized by inserting standard portable electronic devices into bespoke pockets and arranging interconnects and cabling across the garment. In these examples, the textile merely served as a vehicle to house the electronics and had no inherent electronic functionality. A reduction in electronic component size, the development of flexible circuits, and the ability to weave robust interconnects offer the potential for improved levels of electronic integration within the textile. The weaving of electronic circuit filaments less than 2 mm wide into fabrics such that the electronics are fully concealed in the textile and given extra protection by the surrounding textile fibers is introduced. The failure mechanisms for different filament circuit designs before and after integration into the textile are investigated with a 90° cyclical bending test. Results show that encapsulated filament circuits embedded within the textile survive 45 washing cycles and more than 1500 cycles of 90° bending around a bending radius of 10 mm, performing five times better than equivalent filament circuits before integration into the fabric.
2365-709X
1900176
Komolafe, Abiodun
5e79fbab-38be-4a64-94d5-867a94690932
Torah, Russel
7147b47b-db01-4124-95dc-90d6a9842688
Wei, Yang
c6d13914-4f35-459c-8c25-8f8b77b7c5b3
Nunes‐matos, Helga
7974a579-3e84-4001-a7d7-1c50337af0e2
Li, Menglong
23dd02ab-027d-46ca-a8eb-ac9b73f3916f
Hardy, Dorothy
4157fde4-390b-4d4b-92c7-574ab3fe97b6
Dias, Tilak
570e8dc8-5941-471e-9867-846bf518596c
Tudor, Michael
46eea408-2246-4aa0-8b44-86169ed601ff
Beeby, Stephen
ba565001-2812-4300-89f1-fe5a437ecb0d
Komolafe, Abiodun
5e79fbab-38be-4a64-94d5-867a94690932
Torah, Russel
7147b47b-db01-4124-95dc-90d6a9842688
Wei, Yang
c6d13914-4f35-459c-8c25-8f8b77b7c5b3
Nunes‐matos, Helga
7974a579-3e84-4001-a7d7-1c50337af0e2
Li, Menglong
23dd02ab-027d-46ca-a8eb-ac9b73f3916f
Hardy, Dorothy
4157fde4-390b-4d4b-92c7-574ab3fe97b6
Dias, Tilak
570e8dc8-5941-471e-9867-846bf518596c
Tudor, Michael
46eea408-2246-4aa0-8b44-86169ed601ff
Beeby, Stephen
ba565001-2812-4300-89f1-fe5a437ecb0d

Komolafe, Abiodun, Torah, Russel, Wei, Yang, Nunes‐matos, Helga, Li, Menglong, Hardy, Dorothy, Dias, Tilak, Tudor, Michael and Beeby, Stephen (2019) Integrating flexible filament circuits for e‐textile applications. Advanced Materials Technologies, 1900176. (doi:10.1002/admt.201900176).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Practical wearable e‐textiles must be durable and retain, as far as possible, the textile properties such as drape, feel, lightweight, breathability, and washability that make fabrics suitable for clothing. Early e‐textile garments were realized by inserting standard portable electronic devices into bespoke pockets and arranging interconnects and cabling across the garment. In these examples, the textile merely served as a vehicle to house the electronics and had no inherent electronic functionality. A reduction in electronic component size, the development of flexible circuits, and the ability to weave robust interconnects offer the potential for improved levels of electronic integration within the textile. The weaving of electronic circuit filaments less than 2 mm wide into fabrics such that the electronics are fully concealed in the textile and given extra protection by the surrounding textile fibers is introduced. The failure mechanisms for different filament circuit designs before and after integration into the textile are investigated with a 90° cyclical bending test. Results show that encapsulated filament circuits embedded within the textile survive 45 washing cycles and more than 1500 cycles of 90° bending around a bending radius of 10 mm, performing five times better than equivalent filament circuits before integration into the fabric.

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Submitted date: 26 February 2019
Accepted/In Press date: 9 May 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 13 June 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 431977
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/431977
ISSN: 2365-709X
PURE UUID: de11b817-be6e-4ba8-becd-cb2cefc2c5f2
ORCID for Russel Torah: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5598-2860
ORCID for Yang Wei: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6195-8595
ORCID for Michael Tudor: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1179-9455
ORCID for Stephen Beeby: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0800-1759

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Date deposited: 25 Jun 2019 16:30
Last modified: 29 Apr 2021 01:34

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