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The duration of the interpregnancy interval in multiparous women and maternal weight gain between pregnancies: findings from a UK population-based cohort

The duration of the interpregnancy interval in multiparous women and maternal weight gain between pregnancies: findings from a UK population-based cohort
The duration of the interpregnancy interval in multiparous women and maternal weight gain between pregnancies: findings from a UK population-based cohort
Maternal obesity in pregnancy increases the risk of adverse long-term health outcomes in both mother and offspring. A population-based cohort of prospectively collected routine antenatal healthcare data collected between January 2003 and September 2017 at University Hospital Southampton, UK was utilised to investigate the association between duration of interpregnancy interval between successive pregnancies and gain in maternal body mass index by the start of the next pregnancy. Records of 19362 women with two or more consecutive singleton live births were analysed. Two-thirds had gained weight when presenting to antenatal care for their subsequent pregnancy with 20% becoming overweight/obese. Compared to an interval of 24–35 months, an interval of 12–23 months was associated with lowest risk of weight gain (adjusted RR 0.91, 99% CI 0.87 to 0.95, p < 0.001) and ≥36 months with greatest risk (adjusted RR 1.11, 99% CI 1.07 to 1.15, p < 0.001) for the first to second pregnancy. This study shows that most multiparous women start their pregnancy with a higher weight than their previous one. An interval of 12–23 months is associated with the lowest risk of starting the second pregnancy with a higher body weight accounting for age. In countries with high prevalence of maternal obesity, birth spacing may merit exploration as a factor impacting on perinatal morbidity.
2045-2322
1-10
Ziauddeen, Nida
3ad67dd8-26ba-498a-af0a-b1174298995b
Roderick, Paul
dbb3cd11-4c51-4844-982b-0eb30ad5085a
Macklon, Nicholas
7db1f4fc-a9f6-431f-a1f2-297bb8c9fb7e
Alwan, Nisreen
0d37b320-f325-4ed3-ba51-0fe2866d5382
Ziauddeen, Nida
3ad67dd8-26ba-498a-af0a-b1174298995b
Roderick, Paul
dbb3cd11-4c51-4844-982b-0eb30ad5085a
Macklon, Nicholas
7db1f4fc-a9f6-431f-a1f2-297bb8c9fb7e
Alwan, Nisreen
0d37b320-f325-4ed3-ba51-0fe2866d5382

Ziauddeen, Nida, Roderick, Paul, Macklon, Nicholas and Alwan, Nisreen (2019) The duration of the interpregnancy interval in multiparous women and maternal weight gain between pregnancies: findings from a UK population-based cohort. Scientific Reports, 9, 1-10, [9175]. (doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45595-0).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Maternal obesity in pregnancy increases the risk of adverse long-term health outcomes in both mother and offspring. A population-based cohort of prospectively collected routine antenatal healthcare data collected between January 2003 and September 2017 at University Hospital Southampton, UK was utilised to investigate the association between duration of interpregnancy interval between successive pregnancies and gain in maternal body mass index by the start of the next pregnancy. Records of 19362 women with two or more consecutive singleton live births were analysed. Two-thirds had gained weight when presenting to antenatal care for their subsequent pregnancy with 20% becoming overweight/obese. Compared to an interval of 24–35 months, an interval of 12–23 months was associated with lowest risk of weight gain (adjusted RR 0.91, 99% CI 0.87 to 0.95, p < 0.001) and ≥36 months with greatest risk (adjusted RR 1.11, 99% CI 1.07 to 1.15, p < 0.001) for the first to second pregnancy. This study shows that most multiparous women start their pregnancy with a higher weight than their previous one. An interval of 12–23 months is associated with the lowest risk of starting the second pregnancy with a higher body weight accounting for age. In countries with high prevalence of maternal obesity, birth spacing may merit exploration as a factor impacting on perinatal morbidity.

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2019 IPI Maternal BMI SR final - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 3 June 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 24 June 2019
Published date: 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 432259
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/432259
ISSN: 2045-2322
PURE UUID: a78ce3c7-d549-45cc-bfd5-09541091db0e
ORCID for Paul Roderick: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9475-6850
ORCID for Nisreen Alwan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4134-8463

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Jul 2019 16:30
Last modified: 10 Jan 2022 03:04

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Contributors

Author: Nida Ziauddeen
Author: Paul Roderick ORCID iD
Author: Nicholas Macklon
Author: Nisreen Alwan ORCID iD

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