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Maternal feeding practices and children's food intake during an ad libitum buffet meal: results from the GUSTO cohort

Maternal feeding practices and children's food intake during an ad libitum buffet meal: results from the GUSTO cohort
Maternal feeding practices and children's food intake during an ad libitum buffet meal: results from the GUSTO cohort
Parents' feeding practices have been shown to be associated with children's food intake and weight status, but little is known about feeding practices in Asian countries. This study used behavioral observation to explore the feeding practices of 201 mothers of 4.5 year-old children in Singapore during an ad libitum buffet lunch. Feeding practices were coded from videos, focusing on behaviors used to prompt the child to eat more food (autonomy-supportive and coercive-controlling prompts to eat, suggesting items from buffet), those to reduce intake (restriction, questioning food choice), and those related to eating rate (hurrying or slowing child eating). Child outcome measures included energy consumed, variety of food items selected, and BMI. Maternal restriction and trying to slow child eating rate were associated with higher energy consumed by the child (r = 0.19 and 0.13, respectively; p < 0.05). Maternal autonomy-supportive prompts and restriction were associated with a greater variety of items selected by children (r = 0.19 and 0.15, respectively; p < 0.05). The frequency of maternal feeding practice use differed across ethnic groups, with Malay mothers using the most prompts to eat (p < 0.05), Chinese mothers most likely to question a child's food choice (p < 0.01), and Indian mothers the last likely to tell the child to eat faster (p < 0.001). There were no differences between ethnic groups for other feeding practices. No associations were found between feeding practices and child BMI. It is possible that feeding practices related to restriction and slowing child eating are adopted in response to children who consume larger portions, although longitudinal or intervention studies are needed to confirm the direction of this relationship and create local recommendations.
0195-6663
1-9
Fries, Lisa
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Chan, Mei Jun
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Quah, Phaik Ling
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Toh, Jia Ying
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Fogel, Anna
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Goh, Ai Ting
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Aris, Izzuddin M.
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Broekman, Birit
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Cai, Shirong
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Mya, Tint
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Chong, Yap Seng
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Shek, Lynette P.
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Lee, Yung Seng
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Yap, Fabian
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Tan, Kok Hian
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Gluckman, Peter D.
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Forde, Ciaran G
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Chong, Mary F.F.
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Fries, Lisa
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Chan, Mei Jun
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Quah, Phaik Ling
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Toh, Jia Ying
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Fogel, Anna
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Goh, Ai Ting
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Aris, Izzuddin M.
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Broekman, Birit
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Cai, Shirong
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Mya, Tint
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Chong, Yap Seng
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Lee, Yung Seng
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Tan, Kok Hian
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Gluckman, Peter D.
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Godfrey, Keith
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Forde, Ciaran G
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Chong, Mary F.F.
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Fries, Lisa, Chan, Mei Jun, Quah, Phaik Ling, Toh, Jia Ying, Fogel, Anna, Goh, Ai Ting, Aris, Izzuddin M., Broekman, Birit, Cai, Shirong, Mya, Tint, Chong, Yap Seng, Shek, Lynette P., Lee, Yung Seng, Yap, Fabian, Tan, Kok Hian, Gluckman, Peter D., Godfrey, Keith, Silva Zolezzi, Irma, Forde, Ciaran G and Chong, Mary F.F. (2019) Maternal feeding practices and children's food intake during an ad libitum buffet meal: results from the GUSTO cohort. Appetite, 142, 1-9, [104371]. (doi:10.1016/j.appet.2019.104371).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Parents' feeding practices have been shown to be associated with children's food intake and weight status, but little is known about feeding practices in Asian countries. This study used behavioral observation to explore the feeding practices of 201 mothers of 4.5 year-old children in Singapore during an ad libitum buffet lunch. Feeding practices were coded from videos, focusing on behaviors used to prompt the child to eat more food (autonomy-supportive and coercive-controlling prompts to eat, suggesting items from buffet), those to reduce intake (restriction, questioning food choice), and those related to eating rate (hurrying or slowing child eating). Child outcome measures included energy consumed, variety of food items selected, and BMI. Maternal restriction and trying to slow child eating rate were associated with higher energy consumed by the child (r = 0.19 and 0.13, respectively; p < 0.05). Maternal autonomy-supportive prompts and restriction were associated with a greater variety of items selected by children (r = 0.19 and 0.15, respectively; p < 0.05). The frequency of maternal feeding practice use differed across ethnic groups, with Malay mothers using the most prompts to eat (p < 0.05), Chinese mothers most likely to question a child's food choice (p < 0.01), and Indian mothers the last likely to tell the child to eat faster (p < 0.001). There were no differences between ethnic groups for other feeding practices. No associations were found between feeding practices and child BMI. It is possible that feeding practices related to restriction and slowing child eating are adopted in response to children who consume larger portions, although longitudinal or intervention studies are needed to confirm the direction of this relationship and create local recommendations.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 15 July 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 16 July 2019
Published date: 1 November 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 432486
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/432486
ISSN: 0195-6663
PURE UUID: d6c8c2c6-d248-45d1-89e6-a2839afaf43c
ORCID for Keith Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Jul 2019 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 07:12

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Contributors

Author: Lisa Fries
Author: Mei Jun Chan
Author: Phaik Ling Quah
Author: Jia Ying Toh
Author: Anna Fogel
Author: Ai Ting Goh
Author: Izzuddin M. Aris
Author: Birit Broekman
Author: Shirong Cai
Author: Tint Mya
Author: Yap Seng Chong
Author: Lynette P. Shek
Author: Yung Seng Lee
Author: Fabian Yap
Author: Kok Hian Tan
Author: Peter D. Gluckman
Author: Keith Godfrey ORCID iD
Author: Irma Silva Zolezzi
Author: Ciaran G Forde
Author: Mary F.F. Chong

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