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The Dunn Worry Questionnaire and the Paranoia Worries Questionnaire: new assessments of worry

The Dunn Worry Questionnaire and the Paranoia Worries Questionnaire: new assessments of worry
The Dunn Worry Questionnaire and the Paranoia Worries Questionnaire: new assessments of worry
Background
The cognitive process of worry, which keeps negative thoughts in mind and elaborates the content, contributes to the occurrence of many mental health disorders. Our principal aim was to develop a straightforward measure of general problematic worry suitable for research and clinical treatment. Our secondary aim was to develop a measure of problematic worry specifically concerning paranoid fears.

Methods
An item pool concerning worry in the past month was evaluated in 250 non-clinical individuals and 50 patients with psychosis in a worry treatment trial. Exploratory factor analysis and item response theory (IRT) informed the selection of scale items. IRT analyses were repeated with the scales administered to 273 non-clinical individuals, 79 patients with psychosis and 93 patients with social anxiety disorder. Other clinical measures were administered to assess concurrent validity. Test-retest reliability was assessed with 75 participants. Sensitivity to change was assessed with 43 patients with psychosis.

Results
A 10-item general worry scale (Dunn Worry Questionnaire; DWQ) and a five-item paranoia worry scale (Paranoia Worries Questionnaire; PWQ) were developed. All items were highly discriminative (DWQ a = 1.98–5.03; PWQ a = 4.10–10.7), indicating small increases in latent worry lead to a high probability of item endorsement. The DWQ was highly informative across a wide range of the worry distribution, whilst the PWQ had greatest precision at clinical levels of paranoia worry. The scales demonstrated excellent internal reliability, test-retest reliability, concurrent validity and sensitivity to change.

Conclusions
The new measures of general problematic worry and worry about paranoid fears have excellent psychometric properties.
0033-2917
1-10
Kingdon, David
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Freeman, Daniel
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Bird, Jessica C
14330393-cdb9-4395-9ba0-ee03cab3f16b
Loe, S.
b3d81034-030a-4343-a146-275b37e99e9b
Startup, Helen
a1d210d2-a4d7-4c2c-bb75-32338bb5eef4
Clark, David
1b9a22ab-ae38-42f2-8c4c-370ae8fb688a
Ehlers, Anke
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Cernis, Emma
385b2cb8-b30e-41cd-b9f7-4d4f1479fdac
Wingham, Gail A
238517f5-1c8f-4dac-8ea5-626ade856b96
Evans, Nicole
c8a89165-2c03-47a4-bf7b-aa0d04d3f1e7
Lister, Rachel
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Pugh, Katherine
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Cordwell, Jacinta
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Dunn, Graham
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Kingdon, David
14cdc422-10b4-4b2d-88ec-24fde5f4329b
Freeman, Daniel
b90a2f85-f05c-40e8-a592-e1545fae654c
Bird, Jessica C
14330393-cdb9-4395-9ba0-ee03cab3f16b
Loe, S.
b3d81034-030a-4343-a146-275b37e99e9b
Startup, Helen
a1d210d2-a4d7-4c2c-bb75-32338bb5eef4
Clark, David
1b9a22ab-ae38-42f2-8c4c-370ae8fb688a
Ehlers, Anke
4b80bc62-a16f-4a4f-8240-a9a5b7484e91
Cernis, Emma
385b2cb8-b30e-41cd-b9f7-4d4f1479fdac
Wingham, Gail A
238517f5-1c8f-4dac-8ea5-626ade856b96
Evans, Nicole
c8a89165-2c03-47a4-bf7b-aa0d04d3f1e7
Lister, Rachel
4c5179ab-eb6f-446d-80fb-8db6a87dcd29
Pugh, Katherine
f57fa299-8688-405b-a2ed-394b65a93153
Cordwell, Jacinta
43edc48c-102d-42c6-b255-8ea972dade4a
Dunn, Graham
ffc12c0e-b002-43fd-bdf7-60e17f4b4871

Kingdon, David, Freeman, Daniel, Bird, Jessica C, Loe, S., Startup, Helen, Clark, David, Ehlers, Anke, Cernis, Emma, Wingham, Gail A, Evans, Nicole, Lister, Rachel, Pugh, Katherine, Cordwell, Jacinta and Dunn, Graham (2019) The Dunn Worry Questionnaire and the Paranoia Worries Questionnaire: new assessments of worry. Psychological Medicine, 49, 1-10. (doi:10.1017/S0033291719000588).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background
The cognitive process of worry, which keeps negative thoughts in mind and elaborates the content, contributes to the occurrence of many mental health disorders. Our principal aim was to develop a straightforward measure of general problematic worry suitable for research and clinical treatment. Our secondary aim was to develop a measure of problematic worry specifically concerning paranoid fears.

Methods
An item pool concerning worry in the past month was evaluated in 250 non-clinical individuals and 50 patients with psychosis in a worry treatment trial. Exploratory factor analysis and item response theory (IRT) informed the selection of scale items. IRT analyses were repeated with the scales administered to 273 non-clinical individuals, 79 patients with psychosis and 93 patients with social anxiety disorder. Other clinical measures were administered to assess concurrent validity. Test-retest reliability was assessed with 75 participants. Sensitivity to change was assessed with 43 patients with psychosis.

Results
A 10-item general worry scale (Dunn Worry Questionnaire; DWQ) and a five-item paranoia worry scale (Paranoia Worries Questionnaire; PWQ) were developed. All items were highly discriminative (DWQ a = 1.98–5.03; PWQ a = 4.10–10.7), indicating small increases in latent worry lead to a high probability of item endorsement. The DWQ was highly informative across a wide range of the worry distribution, whilst the PWQ had greatest precision at clinical levels of paranoia worry. The scales demonstrated excellent internal reliability, test-retest reliability, concurrent validity and sensitivity to change.

Conclusions
The new measures of general problematic worry and worry about paranoid fears have excellent psychometric properties.

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Worry scales paper Psych Med - REVISION CLEAN - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 31 January 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 5 April 2019
Published date: 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 432595
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/432595
ISSN: 0033-2917
PURE UUID: b990484a-a1a2-4956-b36f-cf3f6263e7e6

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Date deposited: 19 Jul 2019 16:40
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 05:03

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