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Additive effects of high growth rate and low transpiration rate drive differences in whole plant transpiration efficiency among black poplar genotypes

Additive effects of high growth rate and low transpiration rate drive differences in whole plant transpiration efficiency among black poplar genotypes
Additive effects of high growth rate and low transpiration rate drive differences in whole plant transpiration efficiency among black poplar genotypes

Poplar plantations, widely used for the production of woody biomass, might be at high risk from the climate change-induced increase in the frequency of drought periods. Therefore, selecting improved genotypes, which are highly productive but with a high water use efficiency (WUE), is becoming a major target. The use of automated weighing systems in controlled environments facilitates the estimation of cumulated water loss and whole plant transpiration efficiency (TE). Differences in TE and leaf level intrinsic WUE as well as the contribution of underlying ecophysiological traits were determined in three contrasting P. nigra genotypes. Strong differences in TE among the selected genotypes were congruent with differences in leaf level intrinsic WUE. Our data show that a high total leaf area was overcompensated by a low per leaf area transpiration rate, leading to higher TE in highly productive genotypes originating from cool locations. Nocturnal water loss was relatively low but contributed to variations in TE among genotypes. In response to drought, leaf level WUE increased but not TE, suggesting that carbon losses due to whole plant respiration could offset the drought-induced increase in intrinsic WUE.

Intraspecific diversity, Nocturnal transpiration, Poplar, Transpiration efficiency, Water deficit, Water use efficiency
0098-8472
Bogeat-Triboulot, M. B.
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Buré, C.
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Gerardin, T.
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Chuste, P. A.
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Le Thiec, D.
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Hummel, I.
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Durand, M.
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Wildhagen, H.
ec35b6ca-3482-454a-9b02-7fb348c469dc
Douthe, C.
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Molins, A.
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Galmés, J.
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Smith, H. K.
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Flexas, J.
516b970c-80cd-444a-bbf9-a3f9ba7be26f
Polle, A.
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Taylor, G.
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Brendel, O.
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Bogeat-Triboulot, M. B.
10db5130-0e8e-4f15-9048-5f5930b0ae7b
Buré, C.
894a8037-0c0c-413c-ba2c-4f5857ac18d8
Gerardin, T.
6f0a25e1-1dd0-43f3-bba9-fb99414925a4
Chuste, P. A.
a16417a9-c405-4351-a3fc-adf949a0fe10
Le Thiec, D.
a3c759c2-7be3-40f8-9807-85d320d76cb5
Hummel, I.
9c06f2e3-1e03-426b-9f95-c3e263d8ca0a
Durand, M.
908bec80-0575-4508-878a-3b38eb10cf16
Wildhagen, H.
ec35b6ca-3482-454a-9b02-7fb348c469dc
Douthe, C.
6a1a4a23-228c-46f3-89ee-c4f70cb875bd
Molins, A.
39f084ee-d991-4502-aeb1-4e3d3ed81817
Galmés, J.
14cb3200-d930-4f0a-93bf-7a269069b6ba
Smith, H. K.
9e5d9adc-6c4a-41a7-9418-e553275cd973
Flexas, J.
516b970c-80cd-444a-bbf9-a3f9ba7be26f
Polle, A.
2c6f5a2f-0c3c-496f-82cf-fdb74a807ac0
Taylor, G.
f3851db9-d37c-4c36-8663-e5c2cb03e171
Brendel, O.
121e4797-8470-4f42-a83a-fe0d3c586e04

Bogeat-Triboulot, M. B., Buré, C., Gerardin, T., Chuste, P. A., Le Thiec, D., Hummel, I., Durand, M., Wildhagen, H., Douthe, C., Molins, A., Galmés, J., Smith, H. K., Flexas, J., Polle, A., Taylor, G. and Brendel, O. (2019) Additive effects of high growth rate and low transpiration rate drive differences in whole plant transpiration efficiency among black poplar genotypes. Environmental and Experimental Botany, 166, [103784]. (doi:10.1016/j.envexpbot.2019.05.021).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Poplar plantations, widely used for the production of woody biomass, might be at high risk from the climate change-induced increase in the frequency of drought periods. Therefore, selecting improved genotypes, which are highly productive but with a high water use efficiency (WUE), is becoming a major target. The use of automated weighing systems in controlled environments facilitates the estimation of cumulated water loss and whole plant transpiration efficiency (TE). Differences in TE and leaf level intrinsic WUE as well as the contribution of underlying ecophysiological traits were determined in three contrasting P. nigra genotypes. Strong differences in TE among the selected genotypes were congruent with differences in leaf level intrinsic WUE. Our data show that a high total leaf area was overcompensated by a low per leaf area transpiration rate, leading to higher TE in highly productive genotypes originating from cool locations. Nocturnal water loss was relatively low but contributed to variations in TE among genotypes. In response to drought, leaf level WUE increased but not TE, suggesting that carbon losses due to whole plant respiration could offset the drought-induced increase in intrinsic WUE.

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Accepted/In Press date: 29 May 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 19 June 2019
Published date: 1 October 2019
Keywords: Intraspecific diversity, Nocturnal transpiration, Poplar, Transpiration efficiency, Water deficit, Water use efficiency

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 432703
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/432703
ISSN: 0098-8472
PURE UUID: 282868c0-e4a2-4baa-b85e-7fa392b58a92
ORCID for G. Taylor: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8470-6390

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Date deposited: 24 Jul 2019 16:30
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:52

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