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Poor health, physical workload and occupational social class as determinants of health-related job loss: results from a prospective cohort study in the UK

Poor health, physical workload and occupational social class as determinants of health-related job loss: results from a prospective cohort study in the UK
Poor health, physical workload and occupational social class as determinants of health-related job loss: results from a prospective cohort study in the UK
Objectives: The aims of the present study were to assess the association and interactions of physical workload and poor health with health-related job loss (HRJL) among older workers, and the association and interactions of occupational social class and poor health with HRJL. Methods: Data were used from an existing prospective cohort study, Health and Employment after Fifty, where employed or self-employed workers aged 50–64 years (n=4909) were followed-up between 2014 and 2016. Associations between potential determinants (self-perceived health status, physical workload and occupational social class) and 2-year HRJL were examined by Cox regression analyses. To study whether physical workload or occupational social class moderates the influence of poor health on HRJL, additive and multiplicative interactions were calculated. Results: Older workers with poor self-perceived health status had increased risk of HRJL during the 2-year follow-up period (men: HR 2.57 (95%CI: 1.68 to 3.92); women: HR 3.26 (95%CI: 2.33 to 4.55)). Furthermore, men with high physical workload were at increased risk for HRJL (HR 1.63 (95%CI: 1.09 to 2.43)). No significant interactions (p<0.05) were identified between poor health and high physical workload, nor between poor health and lower occupational social class. Conclusion: Our study indicates that older workers in poor health, and older workers with a physically demanding job, are at increased risk of HRJL. Having a physically demanding job or working in routine/manual occupations does not moderate the association between poor health and HRJL.
2044-6055
Sewdas, Ranu
3289bbd1-9049-4bf1-ba1d-25eb6c2e3f09
van der Beek, Allard J.
f912da7b-121f-4b41-8a7e-c5ae6180a237
Boot, Cecile R.L.
4a66aad6-85bf-413d-95c4-22507ada64e3
D'angelo, Stefania
13375ecd-1117-4b6e-99c0-32239f52eed6
Syddall, Holly E.
a0181a93-8fc3-4998-a996-7963f0128328
Palmer, Keith T.
0cfe63f0-1d33-40ff-ae8c-6c33601df850
Walker-Bone, Karen
ad7d1336-ed2c-4f39-ade5-da84eb412109
Sewdas, Ranu
3289bbd1-9049-4bf1-ba1d-25eb6c2e3f09
van der Beek, Allard J.
f912da7b-121f-4b41-8a7e-c5ae6180a237
Boot, Cecile R.L.
4a66aad6-85bf-413d-95c4-22507ada64e3
D'angelo, Stefania
13375ecd-1117-4b6e-99c0-32239f52eed6
Syddall, Holly E.
a0181a93-8fc3-4998-a996-7963f0128328
Palmer, Keith T.
0cfe63f0-1d33-40ff-ae8c-6c33601df850
Walker-Bone, Karen
ad7d1336-ed2c-4f39-ade5-da84eb412109

Sewdas, Ranu, van der Beek, Allard J., Boot, Cecile R.L., D'angelo, Stefania, Syddall, Holly E., Palmer, Keith T. and Walker-Bone, Karen (2019) Poor health, physical workload and occupational social class as determinants of health-related job loss: results from a prospective cohort study in the UK. BMJ Open, 9, [e026423]. (doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2018-026423).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives: The aims of the present study were to assess the association and interactions of physical workload and poor health with health-related job loss (HRJL) among older workers, and the association and interactions of occupational social class and poor health with HRJL. Methods: Data were used from an existing prospective cohort study, Health and Employment after Fifty, where employed or self-employed workers aged 50–64 years (n=4909) were followed-up between 2014 and 2016. Associations between potential determinants (self-perceived health status, physical workload and occupational social class) and 2-year HRJL were examined by Cox regression analyses. To study whether physical workload or occupational social class moderates the influence of poor health on HRJL, additive and multiplicative interactions were calculated. Results: Older workers with poor self-perceived health status had increased risk of HRJL during the 2-year follow-up period (men: HR 2.57 (95%CI: 1.68 to 3.92); women: HR 3.26 (95%CI: 2.33 to 4.55)). Furthermore, men with high physical workload were at increased risk for HRJL (HR 1.63 (95%CI: 1.09 to 2.43)). No significant interactions (p<0.05) were identified between poor health and high physical workload, nor between poor health and lower occupational social class. Conclusion: Our study indicates that older workers in poor health, and older workers with a physically demanding job, are at increased risk of HRJL. Having a physically demanding job or working in routine/manual occupations does not moderate the association between poor health and HRJL.

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Accepted/In Press date: 12 June 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 11 July 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 432891
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/432891
ISSN: 2044-6055
PURE UUID: 5cbc4714-1edf-4010-9867-89e5607fa6fc
ORCID for Stefania D'angelo: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7267-1837
ORCID for Holly E. Syddall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0171-0306
ORCID for Karen Walker-Bone: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5992-1459

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 31 Jul 2019 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:59

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Contributors

Author: Ranu Sewdas
Author: Allard J. van der Beek
Author: Cecile R.L. Boot
Author: Stefania D'angelo ORCID iD
Author: Keith T. Palmer

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