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Analysis of the microbial communities in soils of different ages following volcanic eruptions: Microbial communities in volcanic soils

Analysis of the microbial communities in soils of different ages following volcanic eruptions: Microbial communities in volcanic soils
Analysis of the microbial communities in soils of different ages following volcanic eruptions: Microbial communities in volcanic soils
Volcanism is a primary process of land formation. It provides a model to understand soil-forming processes and the role of pioneer Bacteria and/or Archaea as early colonizers in those new environments. The objective of this study was to identify the microbial communities involved in soil formation. DNA was extracted from soil samples of Llaima volcano (Chile) at sites destroyed by lava in different centuries (1640, 1751 and 1957). Bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes were analyzed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Results showed that the microbial diversity increased with soil age, particularly between the 1751 and 1640 soils. For archaeal communities, Thaumarchaeota was detected in similar abundances in all soils but Euryarchaeota were rare in the older soils. The analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes showed high abundances of Chloroflexi (37%), Planctomycetes (18%) and Verrucomicrobia (10%) in the youngest soil. Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria were highly abundant in the oldest soils (16% in 1640 and 15% in 1751 for Acidobacteria; and 38% in 1640 and 27% in 1751 for Proteobacteria). The microbial profiles in the youngest soils were unusual, with a high abundance of bacteria belonging to the order Ktedonobacterales (Chloroflexi) in the 1957 soil (37%) compared with the 1751 (18%) and the 1640 soils (7%). In this study, we show that there is a gradual establishment of the microbial community in volcanic soils following an eruption and that specific microbial groups play a role in the early stages of recovery.
volcanic soils, soil formation, Ktedonobacterales, 16S rRNA gene, high-throughput sequencing
1002-0160
126-134
Hernandez Garcia, Marcela
e73477e7-cf3e-4f50-97c8-4494c5b05cd0
Calabi-Floody, Marcela
1dd27c78-c070-4168-96ff-dbdc6da09257
Conrad, Ralf
b63adcc7-abe3-4e99-9ce6-20f1cc671d96
Dumont, Marc
afd9f08f-bdbb-4cee-b792-1a7f000ee511
Hernandez Garcia, Marcela
e73477e7-cf3e-4f50-97c8-4494c5b05cd0
Calabi-Floody, Marcela
1dd27c78-c070-4168-96ff-dbdc6da09257
Conrad, Ralf
b63adcc7-abe3-4e99-9ce6-20f1cc671d96
Dumont, Marc
afd9f08f-bdbb-4cee-b792-1a7f000ee511

Hernandez Garcia, Marcela, Calabi-Floody, Marcela, Conrad, Ralf and Dumont, Marc (2020) Analysis of the microbial communities in soils of different ages following volcanic eruptions: Microbial communities in volcanic soils. Pedosphere, 30 (1), 126-134. (doi:10.1016/S1002-0160(19)60823-4).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Volcanism is a primary process of land formation. It provides a model to understand soil-forming processes and the role of pioneer Bacteria and/or Archaea as early colonizers in those new environments. The objective of this study was to identify the microbial communities involved in soil formation. DNA was extracted from soil samples of Llaima volcano (Chile) at sites destroyed by lava in different centuries (1640, 1751 and 1957). Bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes were analyzed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Results showed that the microbial diversity increased with soil age, particularly between the 1751 and 1640 soils. For archaeal communities, Thaumarchaeota was detected in similar abundances in all soils but Euryarchaeota were rare in the older soils. The analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes showed high abundances of Chloroflexi (37%), Planctomycetes (18%) and Verrucomicrobia (10%) in the youngest soil. Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria were highly abundant in the oldest soils (16% in 1640 and 15% in 1751 for Acidobacteria; and 38% in 1640 and 27% in 1751 for Proteobacteria). The microbial profiles in the youngest soils were unusual, with a high abundance of bacteria belonging to the order Ktedonobacterales (Chloroflexi) in the 1957 soil (37%) compared with the 1751 (18%) and the 1640 soils (7%). In this study, we show that there is a gradual establishment of the microbial community in volcanic soils following an eruption and that specific microbial groups play a role in the early stages of recovery.

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HernandezM_pedos201901021_final_version29jul19 - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 19 March 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 14 December 2019
Published date: February 2020
Keywords: volcanic soils, soil formation, Ktedonobacterales, 16S rRNA gene, high-throughput sequencing

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433027
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433027
ISSN: 1002-0160
PURE UUID: 36c2a84e-67f2-4924-beeb-79f837aa8a28
ORCID for Marc Dumont: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7347-8668

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Date deposited: 06 Aug 2019 16:31
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 07:11

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Contributors

Author: Marcela Hernandez Garcia
Author: Marcela Calabi-Floody
Author: Ralf Conrad
Author: Marc Dumont ORCID iD

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