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Understanding user reactions and interactions with an internet-based intervention for tinnitus self-management: mixed-methods evaluation

Understanding user reactions and interactions with an internet-based intervention for tinnitus self-management: mixed-methods evaluation
Understanding user reactions and interactions with an internet-based intervention for tinnitus self-management: mixed-methods evaluation
Purpose
Internet-based interventions have the potential to reduce the disparity in access to psychological therapy that people with tinnitus currently experience. One example is the Tinnitus E-Programme, which, although freely available online, has not yet been formally evaluated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate past, current, and new users' reactions and interactions with the Tinnitus E-Programme.

Method
Study 1 used an online survey to gather past and current users' reactions to, and interactions with, the intervention (n = 27). Study 2 used interviews and a relaxation log to assess how new users implemented the skills they learned into their everyday lives (n = 13).

Results
Generally, users expressed positive views on the intervention content and design features. Users particularly valued the education about tinnitus and its management and the relaxation skills training, and use of these components was high. In contrast, user reactions to self-monitoring tools, an online support forum, and therapist support were mixed, and use was lower. Implementation was limited by instances of poor usability and accessibility, user engagement, and adherence to relaxation goals. Users' perceptions of the intervention's credibility and relevance and beliefs regarding a negative impact on their tinnitus influenced engagement. Users in both studies identified several benefits gained, including functional and emotional management, self-efficacy for managing and coping with tinnitus, understanding tinnitus and its management, social support, and acceptance of tinnitus.

Conclusion
Findings suggest that the intervention was acceptable to its target group but also highlighted some areas for improvement. These findings will be used to inform further optimization work.
1059-0889
697-713
Greenwell, Kate
4bac64bd-059f-4d7d-90d3-5c0bccb7ffb2
Sereda, Magdalena
ed765297-068c-4c80-ba69-18d67c9085cc
Coulson, Neil
11e100c8-5059-4747-80c5-b9902b234b4f
Hoare, Derek J.
69d0a4d9-8bd2-4b5e-ac32-605b13de8980
Greenwell, Kate
4bac64bd-059f-4d7d-90d3-5c0bccb7ffb2
Sereda, Magdalena
ed765297-068c-4c80-ba69-18d67c9085cc
Coulson, Neil
11e100c8-5059-4747-80c5-b9902b234b4f
Hoare, Derek J.
69d0a4d9-8bd2-4b5e-ac32-605b13de8980

Greenwell, Kate, Sereda, Magdalena, Coulson, Neil and Hoare, Derek J. (2019) Understanding user reactions and interactions with an internet-based intervention for tinnitus self-management: mixed-methods evaluation. American Journal of Audiology, 28 (3), 697-713. (doi:10.1044/2019_AJA-18-0171).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose
Internet-based interventions have the potential to reduce the disparity in access to psychological therapy that people with tinnitus currently experience. One example is the Tinnitus E-Programme, which, although freely available online, has not yet been formally evaluated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate past, current, and new users' reactions and interactions with the Tinnitus E-Programme.

Method
Study 1 used an online survey to gather past and current users' reactions to, and interactions with, the intervention (n = 27). Study 2 used interviews and a relaxation log to assess how new users implemented the skills they learned into their everyday lives (n = 13).

Results
Generally, users expressed positive views on the intervention content and design features. Users particularly valued the education about tinnitus and its management and the relaxation skills training, and use of these components was high. In contrast, user reactions to self-monitoring tools, an online support forum, and therapist support were mixed, and use was lower. Implementation was limited by instances of poor usability and accessibility, user engagement, and adherence to relaxation goals. Users' perceptions of the intervention's credibility and relevance and beliefs regarding a negative impact on their tinnitus influenced engagement. Users in both studies identified several benefits gained, including functional and emotional management, self-efficacy for managing and coping with tinnitus, understanding tinnitus and its management, social support, and acceptance of tinnitus.

Conclusion
Findings suggest that the intervention was acceptable to its target group but also highlighted some areas for improvement. These findings will be used to inform further optimization work.

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Greenwell, Sereda et al_AJA_manuscript file_Revised_Clean - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 12 June 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 4 September 2019
Published date: September 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433171
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433171
ISSN: 1059-0889
PURE UUID: 8d431146-0008-43b2-a1b9-b9117ff6c07a
ORCID for Kate Greenwell: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3662-1488

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 05:40

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Contributors

Author: Kate Greenwell ORCID iD
Author: Magdalena Sereda
Author: Neil Coulson
Author: Derek J. Hoare

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