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Maternal night-time eating and sleep duration in relation to length of gestation and preterm birth

Maternal night-time eating and sleep duration in relation to length of gestation and preterm birth
Maternal night-time eating and sleep duration in relation to length of gestation and preterm birth
Background & aims Maternal metabolic disturbance arising from inappropriate meal timing or sleep deprivation may disrupt circadian rhythm, potentially inducing pregnancy complications. We examined the associations of maternal night-time eating and sleep duration during pregnancy with gestation length and preterm birth. Methods We studied 673 pregnant women from the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) cohort. Maternal energy intake by time of day and nightly sleep duration were assessed at 26–28 weeks' gestation. Based on 24-h dietary recall, night-eating was defined as consuming >50% of total energy intake from 1900 to 0659 h. Short sleep duration was defined as <6 h night sleep. Night-eating and short sleep were simultaneously analyzed to examine for associations with a) gestation length using multiple linear regression, and b) preterm birth (<37 weeks' gestation) using logistic regression. Results Overall, 15.6% women engaged in night-eating, 12.3% had short sleep and 6.8% delivered preterm. Adjusting for confounding factors, night-eating was associated with 0.45 weeks shortening of gestation length (95% CI −0.75, −0.16) and 2.19-fold higher odds of delivering preterm (1.01, 4.72). Short sleep was associated with 0.33 weeks shortening of gestation length (−0.66, −0.01), but its association with preterm birth did not reach statistical significance (1.81; 0.76, 4.30). Conclusions During pregnancy, women with higher energy consumption at night than during the day had shorter gestation and greater likelihood of delivering preterm. Misalignment of eating time with day–night cycles may be a contributing factor to preterm birth. This points to a potential target for intervention to reduce the risk of preterm birth. Observations for nightly sleep deprivation in relation to gestation length and PTB warrant further confirmation.
0261-5614
Loy, See Ling
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Cheung, Yin Bun
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Cai, Shirong
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Colega, Marjorelee T.
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Godfrey, Keith
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Chong, Yap Seng
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Shek, Lynette Pei-Chi
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Tan, Kok Hian
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Chong, Mary Foong-Fong
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Yap, Fabian
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Chan, Jerry Kok Yen
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Loy, See Ling
6fd10b64-1de2-419e-a5f4-b505be233e6e
Cheung, Yin Bun
c9beaf35-87d8-47f0-b41e-729e7820f991
Cai, Shirong
6e4e2d93-9910-4fc8-91a1-07d445f868a4
Colega, Marjorelee T.
75c5e6c9-9b67-46b9-90e6-e63632163ed8
Godfrey, Keith
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Chong, Yap Seng
7043124b-e892-4d4b-8bb7-6d35ed94e136
Shek, Lynette Pei-Chi
ff5b44bf-5ab5-4249-8cf1-21751a4f6ae8
Tan, Kok Hian
672ae6c4-d4c8-4b1b-8512-efec36431503
Chong, Mary Foong-Fong
1e188259-b1ab-4448-9e65-5b6a0fd99502
Yap, Fabian
22f6b954-31fc-4696-a52b-e985a424b95b
Chan, Jerry Kok Yen
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Loy, See Ling, Cheung, Yin Bun, Cai, Shirong, Colega, Marjorelee T., Godfrey, Keith, Chong, Yap Seng, Shek, Lynette Pei-Chi, Tan, Kok Hian, Chong, Mary Foong-Fong, Yap, Fabian and Chan, Jerry Kok Yen (2019) Maternal night-time eating and sleep duration in relation to length of gestation and preterm birth. Clinical Nutrition. (doi:10.1016/j.clnu.2019.08.018).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background & aims Maternal metabolic disturbance arising from inappropriate meal timing or sleep deprivation may disrupt circadian rhythm, potentially inducing pregnancy complications. We examined the associations of maternal night-time eating and sleep duration during pregnancy with gestation length and preterm birth. Methods We studied 673 pregnant women from the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) cohort. Maternal energy intake by time of day and nightly sleep duration were assessed at 26–28 weeks' gestation. Based on 24-h dietary recall, night-eating was defined as consuming >50% of total energy intake from 1900 to 0659 h. Short sleep duration was defined as <6 h night sleep. Night-eating and short sleep were simultaneously analyzed to examine for associations with a) gestation length using multiple linear regression, and b) preterm birth (<37 weeks' gestation) using logistic regression. Results Overall, 15.6% women engaged in night-eating, 12.3% had short sleep and 6.8% delivered preterm. Adjusting for confounding factors, night-eating was associated with 0.45 weeks shortening of gestation length (95% CI −0.75, −0.16) and 2.19-fold higher odds of delivering preterm (1.01, 4.72). Short sleep was associated with 0.33 weeks shortening of gestation length (−0.66, −0.01), but its association with preterm birth did not reach statistical significance (1.81; 0.76, 4.30). Conclusions During pregnancy, women with higher energy consumption at night than during the day had shorter gestation and greater likelihood of delivering preterm. Misalignment of eating time with day–night cycles may be a contributing factor to preterm birth. This points to a potential target for intervention to reduce the risk of preterm birth. Observations for nightly sleep deprivation in relation to gestation length and PTB warrant further confirmation.

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Accepted/In Press date: 15 August 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 August 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433481
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433481
ISSN: 0261-5614
PURE UUID: ef8579c2-93e6-4b50-a525-62731ad1537d
ORCID for Keith Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618

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Date deposited: 23 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 06:30

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Contributors

Author: See Ling Loy
Author: Yin Bun Cheung
Author: Shirong Cai
Author: Marjorelee T. Colega
Author: Keith Godfrey ORCID iD
Author: Yap Seng Chong
Author: Lynette Pei-Chi Shek
Author: Kok Hian Tan
Author: Mary Foong-Fong Chong
Author: Fabian Yap
Author: Jerry Kok Yen Chan

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