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Diet and immune function

Diet and immune function
Diet and immune function
A well-functioning immune system is critical for survival. The immune system must be constantly alert, monitoring for signs of invasion or danger. Cells of the immune system must be able to distinguish self from non-self and furthermore discriminate between non-self molecules which are harmful (e.g., those from pathogens) and innocuous non-self molecules (e.g., from food). This Special Issue of Nutrients explores the relationship between diet and nutrients and immune function. In this preface, we outline the key functions of the immune system, and how it interacts with nutrients across the life course, highlighting the work included within this Special Issue. This includes the role of macronutrients, micronutrients, and the gut microbiome in mediating immunological effects. Nutritional modulation of the immune system has applications within the clinical setting, but can also have a role in healthy populations, acting to reduce or delay the onset of immune-mediated chronic diseases. Ongoing research in this field will ultimately lead to a better understanding of the role of diet and nutrients in immune function and will facilitate the use of bespoke nutrition to improve human health
1-9
Childs, Caroline
ea17ccc1-2eac-4f67-96c7-a0c4d9dfd9c5
Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Miles, Elizabeth
20332899-ecdb-4214-95bc-922dde36d416
Childs, Caroline
ea17ccc1-2eac-4f67-96c7-a0c4d9dfd9c5
Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Miles, Elizabeth
20332899-ecdb-4214-95bc-922dde36d416

Childs, Caroline, Calder, Philip and Miles, Elizabeth (2019) Diet and immune function. Nutrients, 11 (8), 1-9, [1933]. (doi:10.3390/nu11081933).

Record type: Editorial

Abstract

A well-functioning immune system is critical for survival. The immune system must be constantly alert, monitoring for signs of invasion or danger. Cells of the immune system must be able to distinguish self from non-self and furthermore discriminate between non-self molecules which are harmful (e.g., those from pathogens) and innocuous non-self molecules (e.g., from food). This Special Issue of Nutrients explores the relationship between diet and nutrients and immune function. In this preface, we outline the key functions of the immune system, and how it interacts with nutrients across the life course, highlighting the work included within this Special Issue. This includes the role of macronutrients, micronutrients, and the gut microbiome in mediating immunological effects. Nutritional modulation of the immune system has applications within the clinical setting, but can also have a role in healthy populations, acting to reduce or delay the onset of immune-mediated chronic diseases. Ongoing research in this field will ultimately lead to a better understanding of the role of diet and nutrients in immune function and will facilitate the use of bespoke nutrition to improve human health

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Diet and Immune Function - accepted version - Accepted Manuscript
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nutrients-11-01933-v2 - Version of Record
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 15 August 2019
Published date: 16 August 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433488
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433488
PURE UUID: 4e10c66f-6cd5-4fcc-96ac-561a054cebc0
ORCID for Caroline Childs: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6832-224X
ORCID for Philip Calder: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6038-710X
ORCID for Elizabeth Miles: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8643-0655

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Aug 2019 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:53

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