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Association of Staphylococcus aureus colonization with food allergy occurs independently of eczema severity

Association of Staphylococcus aureus colonization with food allergy occurs independently of eczema severity
Association of Staphylococcus aureus colonization with food allergy occurs independently of eczema severity

BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus has been implicated in the pathophysiology of eczema, allergic rhinitis, asthma, and food allergy. S aureus is a marker of more severe eczema, which is a risk factor for food sensitization/allergy. Therefore it might be that the association between S aureus and food allergy in eczematous patients is related to eczema severity.

OBJECTIVE: We sought to investigate the association of S aureus colonization with specific IgE (sIgE) production to common food allergens and allergies in early childhood independent of eczema severity. We additionally determined the association of S aureus colonization with eczema severity and persistence.

METHODS: In Learning Early About Peanut Allergy (LEAP) study participants eczema severity was assessed, and skin/nasal swabs were cultured for S aureus. Sensitization was identified by measuring sIgE levels. Peanut allergy was primarily determined by means of oral food challenge, and persistent egg allergy was primarily determined by using skin prick tests.

RESULTS: Skin S aureus colonization was significantly associated with eczema severity across the LEAP study, whereas at 12 and 60 months of age, it was related to subsequent eczema deterioration. Skin S aureus colonization at any time point was associated with increased levels of hen's egg white and peanut sIgE independent of eczema severity. Participants with S aureus were more likely to have persistent egg allergy and peanut allergy at 60 and 72 months of age independent of eczema severity. All but one of the 9 LEAP study consumers with peanut allergy (9/312) were colonized at least once with S aureus.

CONCLUSION: S aureus, independent of eczema severity, is associated with food sensitization and allergy and can impair tolerance to foods. This could be an important consideration in future interventions aimed at inducing and maintaining tolerance to food allergens in eczematous infants.

0091-6749
494-503
Tsilochristou, Olympia
5245e4e3-c014-471b-9f6f-781d4423a842
du Toit, George
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Sayre, Peter H.
d9839665-ad89-43ff-b4fd-1f048446a182
Roberts, Graham
ea00db4e-84e7-4b39-8273-9b71dbd7e2f3
Lawson, Kaitie
072d7e3a-a8b2-4cc8-890d-788eddba685c
Sever, Michelle L.
77ce753e-b94e-4304-8e98-01719887348e
Bahnson, Henry T.
2ecc6945-97fd-46bc-8d46-42606d4ccfe0
Radulovic, Suzana
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Basting, Monica
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Plaut, Marshall
d6491653-2a2f-4a73-bbfa-cb9b541fac46
Lack, Gideon
cac030a2-c358-4880-a91d-d67d06e8e321
Immune Tolerance Network Learning Early About Peanut Allergy Study Team
Tsilochristou, Olympia
5245e4e3-c014-471b-9f6f-781d4423a842
du Toit, George
7930b820-e6f7-4c4c-866c-4334017d1106
Sayre, Peter H.
d9839665-ad89-43ff-b4fd-1f048446a182
Roberts, Graham
ea00db4e-84e7-4b39-8273-9b71dbd7e2f3
Lawson, Kaitie
072d7e3a-a8b2-4cc8-890d-788eddba685c
Sever, Michelle L.
77ce753e-b94e-4304-8e98-01719887348e
Bahnson, Henry T.
2ecc6945-97fd-46bc-8d46-42606d4ccfe0
Radulovic, Suzana
8e9bce98-67a2-4999-9898-ccae71e55aa3
Basting, Monica
0b4bc8e4-88a3-46d5-80ee-40228ad58c17
Plaut, Marshall
d6491653-2a2f-4a73-bbfa-cb9b541fac46
Lack, Gideon
cac030a2-c358-4880-a91d-d67d06e8e321

Tsilochristou, Olympia, du Toit, George, Sayre, Peter H., Roberts, Graham, Lawson, Kaitie, Sever, Michelle L., Bahnson, Henry T., Radulovic, Suzana, Basting, Monica, Plaut, Marshall and Lack, Gideon , Immune Tolerance Network Learning Early About Peanut Allergy Study Team (2019) Association of Staphylococcus aureus colonization with food allergy occurs independently of eczema severity. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 144 (2), 494-503. (doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2019.04.025).

Record type: Article

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus has been implicated in the pathophysiology of eczema, allergic rhinitis, asthma, and food allergy. S aureus is a marker of more severe eczema, which is a risk factor for food sensitization/allergy. Therefore it might be that the association between S aureus and food allergy in eczematous patients is related to eczema severity.

OBJECTIVE: We sought to investigate the association of S aureus colonization with specific IgE (sIgE) production to common food allergens and allergies in early childhood independent of eczema severity. We additionally determined the association of S aureus colonization with eczema severity and persistence.

METHODS: In Learning Early About Peanut Allergy (LEAP) study participants eczema severity was assessed, and skin/nasal swabs were cultured for S aureus. Sensitization was identified by measuring sIgE levels. Peanut allergy was primarily determined by means of oral food challenge, and persistent egg allergy was primarily determined by using skin prick tests.

RESULTS: Skin S aureus colonization was significantly associated with eczema severity across the LEAP study, whereas at 12 and 60 months of age, it was related to subsequent eczema deterioration. Skin S aureus colonization at any time point was associated with increased levels of hen's egg white and peanut sIgE independent of eczema severity. Participants with S aureus were more likely to have persistent egg allergy and peanut allergy at 60 and 72 months of age independent of eczema severity. All but one of the 9 LEAP study consumers with peanut allergy (9/312) were colonized at least once with S aureus.

CONCLUSION: S aureus, independent of eczema severity, is associated with food sensitization and allergy and can impair tolerance to foods. This could be an important consideration in future interventions aimed at inducing and maintaining tolerance to food allergens in eczematous infants.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 29 April 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 31 May 2019
Published date: August 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433649
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433649
ISSN: 0091-6749
PURE UUID: f07a8605-fe45-4512-91e3-c70aade6c0e5
ORCID for Graham Roberts: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2252-1248

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Date deposited: 28 Aug 2019 16:31
Last modified: 10 Jan 2022 05:44

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Contributors

Author: Olympia Tsilochristou
Author: George du Toit
Author: Peter H. Sayre
Author: Graham Roberts ORCID iD
Author: Kaitie Lawson
Author: Michelle L. Sever
Author: Henry T. Bahnson
Author: Suzana Radulovic
Author: Monica Basting
Author: Marshall Plaut
Author: Gideon Lack
Corporate Author: Immune Tolerance Network Learning Early About Peanut Allergy Study Team

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