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The reliability and responsiveness of components of breathing pattern

The reliability and responsiveness of components of breathing pattern
The reliability and responsiveness of components of breathing pattern
Breathing pattern (BP) may have the potential to be used to monitor respiratory health and be used as an outcome measure for specific interventions designed to improve respiratory health. However, little published research has examined the reliability and responsiveness of BP. This research examines the reliability and responsiveness of specific components of BP in healthy adults and patients with asthma. It comprises three separate studies: The first study examines the test re-test reliability of BP at rest in both sitting and supine in 50 healthy individuals measured using Respiratory Inductive Plethysmography (RIP). The second study examines the responsiveness of BP before and during recovery from a 10minute moderate physical exercise stimulus in 43 healthy individuals recorded using Structured Light Plethysmography (SLP). The third study recorded BP in 5 participants with asthma using SLP before and after a breathing retraining intervention. Results were: 1) the BP components under examination demonstrated good relative reliability and no systematic bias with Bland-Altman analysis in both the sitting and supine positions. A slightly higher level of test re-test reliability was found for all components in the sitting position in comparison to the supine data. 2) thoracoabdominal motion (TAM) was not significantly changed post exercise in comparison to quiet breathing. Also, TAM responsiveness was not affected by gender. Moreover, there was low relationship between thoracoabdominal motion and timing components. 3) Breath-by-breath analysis did not find any consistency in changes in timing components or TAM following breathing retraining in all participants. Conclusion: This research has produced evidence that the studied components of BP are reliable in healthy adults. Regarding responsiveness, changes in TAM within individuals were observed, but the changes were not found to be significant and did not demonstrate any clear pattern in direction of change. However, the third study involved a small sample size. So, although the BP components were found to remain stable, it is too early to draw firm conclusions regarding the responsiveness.
University of Southampton
Al Alshaikh, Fatimah
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Al Alshaikh, Fatimah
661544be-071d-496a-9d4a-168920839f17
Bruton, Anne
ceae4c46-7827-4a18-bbba-c9bbdb35db43
Barney, Anna
913840b5-0dae-45ae-a6ef-b795863386a2

Al Alshaikh, Fatimah (2018) The reliability and responsiveness of components of breathing pattern. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 383pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Breathing pattern (BP) may have the potential to be used to monitor respiratory health and be used as an outcome measure for specific interventions designed to improve respiratory health. However, little published research has examined the reliability and responsiveness of BP. This research examines the reliability and responsiveness of specific components of BP in healthy adults and patients with asthma. It comprises three separate studies: The first study examines the test re-test reliability of BP at rest in both sitting and supine in 50 healthy individuals measured using Respiratory Inductive Plethysmography (RIP). The second study examines the responsiveness of BP before and during recovery from a 10minute moderate physical exercise stimulus in 43 healthy individuals recorded using Structured Light Plethysmography (SLP). The third study recorded BP in 5 participants with asthma using SLP before and after a breathing retraining intervention. Results were: 1) the BP components under examination demonstrated good relative reliability and no systematic bias with Bland-Altman analysis in both the sitting and supine positions. A slightly higher level of test re-test reliability was found for all components in the sitting position in comparison to the supine data. 2) thoracoabdominal motion (TAM) was not significantly changed post exercise in comparison to quiet breathing. Also, TAM responsiveness was not affected by gender. Moreover, there was low relationship between thoracoabdominal motion and timing components. 3) Breath-by-breath analysis did not find any consistency in changes in timing components or TAM following breathing retraining in all participants. Conclusion: This research has produced evidence that the studied components of BP are reliable in healthy adults. Regarding responsiveness, changes in TAM within individuals were observed, but the changes were not found to be significant and did not demonstrate any clear pattern in direction of change. However, the third study involved a small sample size. So, although the BP components were found to remain stable, it is too early to draw firm conclusions regarding the responsiveness.

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Published date: September 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 433835
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/433835
PURE UUID: b4bfb010-a3e6-4fa9-ae1a-dd94b177fc6d

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Date deposited: 04 Sep 2019 16:30
Last modified: 04 Sep 2019 16:30

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Contributors

Author: Fatimah Al Alshaikh
Thesis advisor: Anne Bruton
Thesis advisor: Anna Barney

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