The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Attitudes toward presidential candidates in the 2012 and 2016 American elections: Cognitive ability and support for Trump

Attitudes toward presidential candidates in the 2012 and 2016 American elections: Cognitive ability and support for Trump
Attitudes toward presidential candidates in the 2012 and 2016 American elections: Cognitive ability and support for Trump
Using data from the American National Election Studies, we investigated the relationship between cognitive ability and attitudes toward and actual voting for presidential candidates in the 2012 and 2016 U.S. presidential elections (i.e., Romney, Obama, Trump, and Clinton). Isolating this relationship from competing relationships, results showed that verbal ability was a significant negative predictor of support and voting for Trump (but not Romney) and a positive predictor of support and voting for Obama and Clinton. By comparing within and across the election years, our analyses revealed the nature of support for Trump, including that support for Trump was better predicted by lower verbal ability than education or income. In general, these results suggest that the 2016 U.S. presidential election had less to do with party affiliation, income, or education and more to do with basic cognitive ability.
1948-5506
924-934
Ganzach, Yoav
c8a27351-6dc6-4d34-8eae-b6ab2cc46164
Hanoch, Yaniv
3cf08e80-8bda-4d3b-af1c-46c858aa9f39
Choma, Becky L.
19e8020d-9ce1-44e0-a054-85c7fee53aea
Ganzach, Yoav
c8a27351-6dc6-4d34-8eae-b6ab2cc46164
Hanoch, Yaniv
3cf08e80-8bda-4d3b-af1c-46c858aa9f39
Choma, Becky L.
19e8020d-9ce1-44e0-a054-85c7fee53aea

Ganzach, Yoav, Hanoch, Yaniv and Choma, Becky L. (2019) Attitudes toward presidential candidates in the 2012 and 2016 American elections: Cognitive ability and support for Trump. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 10 (7), 924-934. (doi:10.1177/1948550618800494).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Using data from the American National Election Studies, we investigated the relationship between cognitive ability and attitudes toward and actual voting for presidential candidates in the 2012 and 2016 U.S. presidential elections (i.e., Romney, Obama, Trump, and Clinton). Isolating this relationship from competing relationships, results showed that verbal ability was a significant negative predictor of support and voting for Trump (but not Romney) and a positive predictor of support and voting for Obama and Clinton. By comparing within and across the election years, our analyses revealed the nature of support for Trump, including that support for Trump was better predicted by lower verbal ability than education or income. In general, these results suggest that the 2016 U.S. presidential election had less to do with party affiliation, income, or education and more to do with basic cognitive ability.

Text
TrumpSPPSr1@ - Accepted Manuscript
Download (165kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 23 August 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 27 September 2018
Published date: 1 September 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 434055
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/434055
ISSN: 1948-5506
PURE UUID: 3c73183c-b332-4651-a5ac-c525c384c192

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Sep 2019 16:30
Last modified: 16 Sep 2019 16:30

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×