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Does medical risk perception and risk taking change with age?: Medical risk perception and risk taking

Does medical risk perception and risk taking change with age?: Medical risk perception and risk taking
Does medical risk perception and risk taking change with age?: Medical risk perception and risk taking
Across adulthood, people face increasingly more risky medical problems and decisions. However, little is known about changes in medical risk taking across adulthood. Therefore, the current cross‐sectional study investigated age‐related differences in medical risk taking with N = 317 adults aged 20–77 years using newly developed scenarios to assess medical risk taking, and additional measures designed to evaluate risk‐taking behavior in the medical domain. Greater expected benefits on the Domain‐Specific Risk‐Taking Scale—Medical (DOSPERT‐M) predicted more active risk taking, whereas higher perceived risk predicted less active risk taking. Next, we examined differences in active and passive risk taking, where passive risk taking refers to risk taking that is associated with inaction. Age was associated with less passive risk taking, but not with active risk taking, risk perception, or expected benefits on the DOSPERT‐M. Participants were overall more likely to opt for taking medical action than not, even more so for a scenario about a vaccine for a deadly flu than for a scenario about a chemotherapy treatment for cancer. Overall, participants were more likely to accept medication (vaccine or chemotherapy) for their child than for themselves. Increasing age was associated with a lower likelihood of accepting the treatment or vaccine for oneself. Taken together, our study provides important insights about changes in medical risk taking across adulthood when people face an increasing number of complex and risky medical decisions.
0272-4332
917-928
Hanoch, Yaniv
3cf08e80-8bda-4d3b-af1c-46c858aa9f39
Rolison, Jonathan J.
cf36bbd8-46bc-428f-943e-5c0e05c59c2a
Freund, Alexandra M.
6eabfdc2-d06f-4f67-b232-c080d7ecf4dc
Hanoch, Yaniv
3cf08e80-8bda-4d3b-af1c-46c858aa9f39
Rolison, Jonathan J.
cf36bbd8-46bc-428f-943e-5c0e05c59c2a
Freund, Alexandra M.
6eabfdc2-d06f-4f67-b232-c080d7ecf4dc

Hanoch, Yaniv, Rolison, Jonathan J. and Freund, Alexandra M. (2018) Does medical risk perception and risk taking change with age?: Medical risk perception and risk taking. Risk Analysis, 38 (5), 917-928. (doi:10.1111/risa.12692).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Across adulthood, people face increasingly more risky medical problems and decisions. However, little is known about changes in medical risk taking across adulthood. Therefore, the current cross‐sectional study investigated age‐related differences in medical risk taking with N = 317 adults aged 20–77 years using newly developed scenarios to assess medical risk taking, and additional measures designed to evaluate risk‐taking behavior in the medical domain. Greater expected benefits on the Domain‐Specific Risk‐Taking Scale—Medical (DOSPERT‐M) predicted more active risk taking, whereas higher perceived risk predicted less active risk taking. Next, we examined differences in active and passive risk taking, where passive risk taking refers to risk taking that is associated with inaction. Age was associated with less passive risk taking, but not with active risk taking, risk perception, or expected benefits on the DOSPERT‐M. Participants were overall more likely to opt for taking medical action than not, even more so for a scenario about a vaccine for a deadly flu than for a scenario about a chemotherapy treatment for cancer. Overall, participants were more likely to accept medication (vaccine or chemotherapy) for their child than for themselves. Increasing age was associated with a lower likelihood of accepting the treatment or vaccine for oneself. Taken together, our study provides important insights about changes in medical risk taking across adulthood when people face an increasing number of complex and risky medical decisions.

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Risk analysis revised final medical risk taking - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 22 July 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 23 September 2016
Published date: 1 May 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 434059
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/434059
ISSN: 0272-4332
PURE UUID: 12e0967d-fabe-4de3-95a6-0b0118bfdeee
ORCID for Yaniv Hanoch: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9453-4588

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Date deposited: 11 Sep 2019 16:30
Last modified: 28 Apr 2022 02:28

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Contributors

Author: Yaniv Hanoch ORCID iD
Author: Jonathan J. Rolison
Author: Alexandra M. Freund

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