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Identified handover tools and techniques in high-risk domains: using distributed situation awareness theory to inform current practices

Identified handover tools and techniques in high-risk domains: using distributed situation awareness theory to inform current practices
Identified handover tools and techniques in high-risk domains: using distributed situation awareness theory to inform current practices

In high-risk domains, poor shift handover has been identified as a key contributing factor in many incidents. This raises the question of: how can personnel collaborate effectively during shift changes? The vast majority of handover literature relates mainly to healthcare, aviation, energy generation and distribution domains. This review identified 19 distinct handover tools/techniques (HTTs) that domains employ to improve handover communication. The most prevalent HTT is standardisation in the form of a structured checklist, followed by the bidirectional exchange of information. This review assesses and summarises HTTs using ‘distributed situation awareness’ theory, and provides a comprehensive review on what is currently practised in high-risk domain handover, as well as a discussion around their potential contribution to raising distributed situation awareness.

Communication, Distributed situation awareness, Handoff, Handover
0925-7535
915-924
Clark, Jediah R.
5d82ac6c-58be-4366-9b11-5e3179d85b33
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Revell, Kirsten M.A.
f280757d-7825-4cb6-9266-456d348f9a75
Clark, Jediah R.
5d82ac6c-58be-4366-9b11-5e3179d85b33
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Revell, Kirsten M.A.
f280757d-7825-4cb6-9266-456d348f9a75

Clark, Jediah R., Stanton, Neville A. and Revell, Kirsten M.A. (2019) Identified handover tools and techniques in high-risk domains: using distributed situation awareness theory to inform current practices. Safety Science, 118, 915-924. (doi:10.1016/j.ssci.2019.06.033).

Record type: Review

Abstract

In high-risk domains, poor shift handover has been identified as a key contributing factor in many incidents. This raises the question of: how can personnel collaborate effectively during shift changes? The vast majority of handover literature relates mainly to healthcare, aviation, energy generation and distribution domains. This review identified 19 distinct handover tools/techniques (HTTs) that domains employ to improve handover communication. The most prevalent HTT is standardisation in the form of a structured checklist, followed by the bidirectional exchange of information. This review assesses and summarises HTTs using ‘distributed situation awareness’ theory, and provides a comprehensive review on what is currently practised in high-risk domain handover, as well as a discussion around their potential contribution to raising distributed situation awareness.

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Accepted/In Press date: 20 June 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 25 June 2019
Published date: October 2019
Keywords: Communication, Distributed situation awareness, Handoff, Handover

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 434109
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/434109
ISSN: 0925-7535
PURE UUID: 7e9222ec-7c40-48bc-8ff4-36ea3d3d5e6a
ORCID for Jediah R. Clark: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1356-2462
ORCID for Neville A. Stanton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8562-3279

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Sep 2019 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 06:37

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Contributors

Author: Jediah R. Clark ORCID iD
Author: Kirsten M.A. Revell

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