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Balancing railway network availability and engineering access

Balancing railway network availability and engineering access
Balancing railway network availability and engineering access
As traffic on Britain's railways has grown, the system is approaching capacity and moving towards 24/7 operation. This increases wear and tear, and reduces access for maintenance, renewal and enhancement. Increasing costs of renewals and enhancements are also questioned, amid funding scarcity. Alongside predictive and preventive maintenance, improved planning and implementation of renewals and enhancements are needed, balancing network availability for train operations with cost-effective construction activities. Typically, extended track possessions maximise construction efficiency but also reduce network availability for operations, whereas short possessions maintain network availability but are least efficient for construction purposes. The effects of infrastructure activities on network availability have typically been monitored and assessed retrospectively, rather than being planned proactively to maximise network availability or to optimise the trade-offs between network availability and engineering efficiency. This paper reviews the current situation and identifies opportunities to enhance planning processes and the balance between network availability and engineering efficiency.
0965-092X
1-9
Armstrong, John
5fafa91e-39c1-4d1d-a331-564558aaa638
Preston, John
ef81c42e-c896-4768-92d1-052662037f0b
Armstrong, John
5fafa91e-39c1-4d1d-a331-564558aaa638
Preston, John
ef81c42e-c896-4768-92d1-052662037f0b

Armstrong, John and Preston, John (2019) Balancing railway network availability and engineering access. Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Transport, 1-9. (doi:10.1680/jtran.19.00045). (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

As traffic on Britain's railways has grown, the system is approaching capacity and moving towards 24/7 operation. This increases wear and tear, and reduces access for maintenance, renewal and enhancement. Increasing costs of renewals and enhancements are also questioned, amid funding scarcity. Alongside predictive and preventive maintenance, improved planning and implementation of renewals and enhancements are needed, balancing network availability for train operations with cost-effective construction activities. Typically, extended track possessions maximise construction efficiency but also reduce network availability for operations, whereas short possessions maintain network availability but are least efficient for construction purposes. The effects of infrastructure activities on network availability have typically been monitored and assessed retrospectively, rather than being planned proactively to maximise network availability or to optimise the trade-offs between network availability and engineering efficiency. This paper reviews the current situation and identifies opportunities to enhance planning processes and the balance between network availability and engineering efficiency.

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Accepted/In Press date: 3 June 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 434207
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/434207
ISSN: 0965-092X
PURE UUID: 9e36835c-97b9-4483-87cc-db96b7aba2f0
ORCID for John Preston: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6866-049X

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Date deposited: 16 Sep 2019 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:50

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