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Challenges in studying geographic atrophy (GA) age-related macular degeneration: the potential of a new mouse model with GA-like features

Challenges in studying geographic atrophy (GA) age-related macular degeneration: the potential of a new mouse model with GA-like features
Challenges in studying geographic atrophy (GA) age-related macular degeneration: the potential of a new mouse model with GA-like features
Loss of central vision critical to everyday activities such as reading, face-recognition and driving due to damage in the central retina (the macula) is the leading cause of irreversible blindness amongst adults in the developed world. This condition, termed age-related macular degeneration (AMD), is a complex, chronic degenerative disease driven by a combination of genetic and lifestyle risk factors. Early signs of retinal changes in people as young as 30-40 years have been reported, although these individuals appear to be asymptomatic. However, by the age of 65 the disease is present in ~3% of individuals, which increases dramatically to affect 1/3 of individuals by the eighth decade of life. Early to intermediate AMD is estimated to affect ~150 million individuals globally, with another 10 million individuals suffering from end-stage, sight-threatening forms. These terminal stages are broadly grouped into dry (GA: geographic atrophy) or wet (CNV: choroidal neovascular) AMD (Sarks et al., 1988; Bird et al., 2014), with similar frequencies reported in patients. Recent advances in identifying genetic risk factors, including our discoveries in this field, indicate an initial shared pathology before progressing to aforementioned late-stage phenotypes. Currently, GA patients have no effective treatment, which may in part be due to the lack of good in-vivo models for GA studies. Here, we summarise our new findings that describe an altogether new mouse model with GA-like features which shows progressive outer retinal pathology (Ibbett et al., 2019) that can be used to gain novel insights into GA and potentially as a tool for drug development.
1673-5374
863-864
Ratnayaka, J. Arjuna
002499b8-1a9f-45b6-9539-5ac145799dfd
Lotery, Andrew
5ecc2d2d-d0b4-468f-ad2c-df7156f8e514
Ratnayaka, J. Arjuna
002499b8-1a9f-45b6-9539-5ac145799dfd
Lotery, Andrew
5ecc2d2d-d0b4-468f-ad2c-df7156f8e514

Ratnayaka, J. Arjuna and Lotery, Andrew (2020) Challenges in studying geographic atrophy (GA) age-related macular degeneration: the potential of a new mouse model with GA-like features. Neural Regeneration Research, 15 (5), 863-864. (doi:10.4103/1673-5374.268972).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Loss of central vision critical to everyday activities such as reading, face-recognition and driving due to damage in the central retina (the macula) is the leading cause of irreversible blindness amongst adults in the developed world. This condition, termed age-related macular degeneration (AMD), is a complex, chronic degenerative disease driven by a combination of genetic and lifestyle risk factors. Early signs of retinal changes in people as young as 30-40 years have been reported, although these individuals appear to be asymptomatic. However, by the age of 65 the disease is present in ~3% of individuals, which increases dramatically to affect 1/3 of individuals by the eighth decade of life. Early to intermediate AMD is estimated to affect ~150 million individuals globally, with another 10 million individuals suffering from end-stage, sight-threatening forms. These terminal stages are broadly grouped into dry (GA: geographic atrophy) or wet (CNV: choroidal neovascular) AMD (Sarks et al., 1988; Bird et al., 2014), with similar frequencies reported in patients. Recent advances in identifying genetic risk factors, including our discoveries in this field, indicate an initial shared pathology before progressing to aforementioned late-stage phenotypes. Currently, GA patients have no effective treatment, which may in part be due to the lack of good in-vivo models for GA studies. Here, we summarise our new findings that describe an altogether new mouse model with GA-like features which shows progressive outer retinal pathology (Ibbett et al., 2019) that can be used to gain novel insights into GA and potentially as a tool for drug development.

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Ratnayaka and Lotery_perspective_Revised - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

In preparation date: 12 September 2019
Accepted/In Press date: 12 September 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 8 November 2019
Published date: May 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 434330
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/434330
ISSN: 1673-5374
PURE UUID: 566c97cc-accc-4b7c-8134-017ee962afbf
ORCID for J. Arjuna Ratnayaka: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1027-6938
ORCID for Andrew Lotery: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5541-4305

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Sep 2019 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 03:01

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