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Printing bone in a gel: using nanocomposite bioink to print functionalised bone scaffolds

Printing bone in a gel: using nanocomposite bioink to print functionalised bone scaffolds
Printing bone in a gel: using nanocomposite bioink to print functionalised bone scaffolds
Free-form printing offers a novel biofabrication approach to generate complex shapes by depositing hydrogel materials within a temporary supportive environment. However, printed hydrogels typically lack the requisite mechanical properties and functionality of the desired tissue, limiting application and, more importantly, safety and efficacy of the implant. We have developed an innovative nanoclay-based bioink to print high shape fidelity functional constructs for potential skeletal application. Laponite® (LAP) nanoclay was combined with gellan gum (GG) to generate a printable hydrogel that was highly stable in vitro, displayed limited swelling ability compared to the silicate-free control and remained stable over time. An agarose fluid gel was found to provide the requisite support for the deposition of the material ink and preservation of the printed structure prior to crosslinking. Printed C2C12 myoblasts remained viable and displayed extensive proliferation over 21 days in culture. Cell-laden scaffolds demonstrated functionality within 1 day of culture in vitro and that was preserved over 3 weeks. Analysis of absorption and release mechanisms from LAP-GG using model proteins (lysozyme and bovine serum albumin (BSA)) demonstrated the retention capability of the clay-based materials for compound localisation and absence of burst release. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was loaded within the agarose fluid gel and absorbed by the material ink via absorbtion during deposition. The 3D printed constructs was implanted on the chorioallantoic membrane of a 10-days old developing chick. Extensive and preferential vasculature infiltration was observed in LAP-GG loaded VEGF constructs compared to controls (p<0.01 and p<0.0001) after only 7 days of incubation. The current studies demonstrate, for the first time, the application of innovative LAP-GG 3D constructs in the generation of growth factor loaded 3D constructs for potential application in skeletal tissue repair.
1369-7021
1-12
Cidonio, Gianluca
558ad583-899a-4d8c-b42b-bc1c354c8757
Cooke, M.
aa3780dd-f695-4998-9fda-44e3bb4b5d4a
Glinka, Michael
7630ab6c-91c5-4840-9c25-12cb61fcb91e
Dawson, Jonathan
b220fe76-498d-47be-9995-92da6c289cf3
Grover, Liam
8ef9f192-0927-4f81-86b2-1904d0149430
Oreffo, Richard
ff9fff72-6855-4d0f-bfb2-311d0e8f3778
Cidonio, Gianluca
558ad583-899a-4d8c-b42b-bc1c354c8757
Cooke, M.
aa3780dd-f695-4998-9fda-44e3bb4b5d4a
Glinka, Michael
7630ab6c-91c5-4840-9c25-12cb61fcb91e
Dawson, Jonathan
b220fe76-498d-47be-9995-92da6c289cf3
Grover, Liam
8ef9f192-0927-4f81-86b2-1904d0149430
Oreffo, Richard
ff9fff72-6855-4d0f-bfb2-311d0e8f3778

Cidonio, Gianluca, Cooke, M., Glinka, Michael, Dawson, Jonathan, Grover, Liam and Oreffo, Richard (2019) Printing bone in a gel: using nanocomposite bioink to print functionalised bone scaffolds. Materials Today, 4, 1-12, [100028]. (doi:10.1016/j.mtbio.2019.100028).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Free-form printing offers a novel biofabrication approach to generate complex shapes by depositing hydrogel materials within a temporary supportive environment. However, printed hydrogels typically lack the requisite mechanical properties and functionality of the desired tissue, limiting application and, more importantly, safety and efficacy of the implant. We have developed an innovative nanoclay-based bioink to print high shape fidelity functional constructs for potential skeletal application. Laponite® (LAP) nanoclay was combined with gellan gum (GG) to generate a printable hydrogel that was highly stable in vitro, displayed limited swelling ability compared to the silicate-free control and remained stable over time. An agarose fluid gel was found to provide the requisite support for the deposition of the material ink and preservation of the printed structure prior to crosslinking. Printed C2C12 myoblasts remained viable and displayed extensive proliferation over 21 days in culture. Cell-laden scaffolds demonstrated functionality within 1 day of culture in vitro and that was preserved over 3 weeks. Analysis of absorption and release mechanisms from LAP-GG using model proteins (lysozyme and bovine serum albumin (BSA)) demonstrated the retention capability of the clay-based materials for compound localisation and absence of burst release. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was loaded within the agarose fluid gel and absorbed by the material ink via absorbtion during deposition. The 3D printed constructs was implanted on the chorioallantoic membrane of a 10-days old developing chick. Extensive and preferential vasculature infiltration was observed in LAP-GG loaded VEGF constructs compared to controls (p<0.01 and p<0.0001) after only 7 days of incubation. The current studies demonstrate, for the first time, the application of innovative LAP-GG 3D constructs in the generation of growth factor loaded 3D constructs for potential application in skeletal tissue repair.

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Accepted/In Press date: 6 September 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 16 September 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 434607
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/434607
ISSN: 1369-7021
PURE UUID: 2e6a5672-59bd-4088-82f3-edf95d41bbdb
ORCID for Jonathan Dawson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6712-0598
ORCID for Richard Oreffo: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5995-6726

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Oct 2019 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 01:55

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