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Patient involvement in pressure ulcer prevention and adherence to prevention strategies an integrative review

Patient involvement in pressure ulcer prevention and adherence to prevention strategies an integrative review
Patient involvement in pressure ulcer prevention and adherence to prevention strategies an integrative review
Background: chronic wounds including pressure ulcers represent a significant burden to patients and healthcare providers. Increasingly patients are required to self-manage their care but patient adherence to prevention strategies is a significant clinical challenge. It is important to increase understanding of the factors affecting patients’ ability and willingness to follow pressure ulcer prevention interventions.

Objectives: to investigate from a patient perspective the factors affecting adherence to pressure ulcer prevention strategies.

Design: Integrative Literature Review

Data Sources: systematic search of electronic databases (Athens, Pub Med, Web of Science, Science Direct, AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, PsychInfo, Google Scholar, Delphis) was initially conducted in May 2017 (repeated August 2018).

Review Methods: the methodological quality was assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) principles. The Noticing, Collecting, Thinking (NCT) model of qualitative data analysis was used to identify key themes.

Results: total of twelve studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. The majority of studies were qualitative and three key themes were identified: i) individual/daily lifestyle considerations, ii) patient involvement in the decision-making process, and iii) pain and/or discomfort.

Conclusion: there is limited research that focuses on the patient view of factors affecting adherence to prevention measures, particularly in community settings. Individual and daily lifestyle considerations and involvement in decision-making around pressure ulcer care are important aspects from the patient perspective. Further research is necessary to explore which factors affect patient adherence in order to improve clinical practice and support patient involvement in preventative strategies.
0.1016/j.ijnurstu.2019.103449
0020-7489
Ledger, Lisa
d5f5e2fd-b6f2-47aa-bcd2-35c155e782ad
Worsley, Peter
6d33aee3-ef43-468d-aef6-86d190de6756
Hope, Jo
5d49099e-13bc-49d2-88d8-48e1ec6d25fc
Schoonhoven, Lisette
46a2705b-c657-409b-b9da-329d5b1b02de
Ledger, Lisa
d5f5e2fd-b6f2-47aa-bcd2-35c155e782ad
Worsley, Peter
6d33aee3-ef43-468d-aef6-86d190de6756
Hope, Jo
5d49099e-13bc-49d2-88d8-48e1ec6d25fc
Schoonhoven, Lisette
46a2705b-c657-409b-b9da-329d5b1b02de

Ledger, Lisa, Worsley, Peter, Hope, Jo and Schoonhoven, Lisette (2020) Patient involvement in pressure ulcer prevention and adherence to prevention strategies an integrative review. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 101, [103449]. (0.1016/j.ijnurstu.2019.103449).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: chronic wounds including pressure ulcers represent a significant burden to patients and healthcare providers. Increasingly patients are required to self-manage their care but patient adherence to prevention strategies is a significant clinical challenge. It is important to increase understanding of the factors affecting patients’ ability and willingness to follow pressure ulcer prevention interventions.

Objectives: to investigate from a patient perspective the factors affecting adherence to pressure ulcer prevention strategies.

Design: Integrative Literature Review

Data Sources: systematic search of electronic databases (Athens, Pub Med, Web of Science, Science Direct, AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, PsychInfo, Google Scholar, Delphis) was initially conducted in May 2017 (repeated August 2018).

Review Methods: the methodological quality was assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) principles. The Noticing, Collecting, Thinking (NCT) model of qualitative data analysis was used to identify key themes.

Results: total of twelve studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. The majority of studies were qualitative and three key themes were identified: i) individual/daily lifestyle considerations, ii) patient involvement in the decision-making process, and iii) pain and/or discomfort.

Conclusion: there is limited research that focuses on the patient view of factors affecting adherence to prevention measures, particularly in community settings. Individual and daily lifestyle considerations and involvement in decision-making around pressure ulcer care are important aspects from the patient perspective. Further research is necessary to explore which factors affect patient adherence in order to improve clinical practice and support patient involvement in preventative strategies.

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Patient involvement in pressure ulcer prevention and adherence to prevention strategies An integrative review - Author's Original
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Patient involvement in pressure ulcer prevention and adherence to prevention strategies An integrative review - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 14 October 2020.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 5 October 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 14 October 2019
Published date: January 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 435054
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/435054
DOI: 0.1016/j.ijnurstu.2019.103449
ISSN: 0020-7489
PURE UUID: fc38a9d9-7672-4c90-a6a9-d40046c11e6c
ORCID for Peter Worsley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0145-5042
ORCID for Jo Hope: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8939-7045
ORCID for Lisette Schoonhoven: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7129-3766

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Date deposited: 21 Oct 2019 16:30
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:41

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Contributors

Author: Lisa Ledger
Author: Peter Worsley ORCID iD
Author: Jo Hope ORCID iD
Author: Lisette Schoonhoven ORCID iD

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