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Riding the emotional roller-coaster: Using the circumplex model of affect to model motorcycle riders’ emotional state-changes at intersections

Riding the emotional roller-coaster: Using the circumplex model of affect to model motorcycle riders’ emotional state-changes at intersections
Riding the emotional roller-coaster: Using the circumplex model of affect to model motorcycle riders’ emotional state-changes at intersections

This study uses Russell's Circumplex Model of Affect to examine whether motorcycle rider emotion is contingent on the environment and behavior. If it is contingent then it becomes predictable. If it is predictable it becomes potentially usable for innovating new ways to improve the safety and utility of this important transport mode. Eighteen motorcyclists took part in a 15 km on-road study during which they were videoed, tracked via GPS, and followed by a ‘chase vehicle’ as they negotiated intersections, all the while providing a concurrent verbal commentary. The verbal commentary was content analysed using a novel method for mapping the verbalized emotional themes to the Circumplex Model. Network analysis was then used to explore the state changes between affective zones in the model. Riders’ emotions at intersections were found to vacillate between negative and positive affect, demonstrating high degrees of emotional dynamism. Many of these transitions occur in and out of the dominant positive state of calmness, with non-calm states appearing to be aversive and those which riders were seeking to avoid. Knowing this brings forward interesting new approaches for safe intersection design.

Circumplex model of affect, Emotion, Intersection, Motorcycles riding, Verbal protocol
1369-8478
139-150
Samuel, Olugbenga
34f41378-97f9-4fcc-9868-490ebe454399
Walker, Guy
50ec35f0-b93b-431e-b4e4-2f1a5fae7904
Salmon, Paul
5398e747-09a5-47c2-9982-2906880c64c6
Filtness, Ashleigh
e5f1053c-4a84-4bf5-9586-e88057fca20e
Stevens, Nicholas
2413f2c4-9d58-4752-9ab6-62da8d8022d4
Mulvihill, Christine
b47d2164-2486-4baa-877b-ffdae03dbd07
Payne, Sarah
f3e3bf64-bb8f-4ce3-a854-ea3c4d54f316
Stanton, Neville
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Samuel, Olugbenga
34f41378-97f9-4fcc-9868-490ebe454399
Walker, Guy
50ec35f0-b93b-431e-b4e4-2f1a5fae7904
Salmon, Paul
5398e747-09a5-47c2-9982-2906880c64c6
Filtness, Ashleigh
e5f1053c-4a84-4bf5-9586-e88057fca20e
Stevens, Nicholas
2413f2c4-9d58-4752-9ab6-62da8d8022d4
Mulvihill, Christine
b47d2164-2486-4baa-877b-ffdae03dbd07
Payne, Sarah
f3e3bf64-bb8f-4ce3-a854-ea3c4d54f316
Stanton, Neville
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd

Samuel, Olugbenga, Walker, Guy, Salmon, Paul, Filtness, Ashleigh, Stevens, Nicholas, Mulvihill, Christine, Payne, Sarah and Stanton, Neville (2019) Riding the emotional roller-coaster: Using the circumplex model of affect to model motorcycle riders’ emotional state-changes at intersections. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 66, 139-150. (doi:10.1016/j.trf.2019.08.018).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This study uses Russell's Circumplex Model of Affect to examine whether motorcycle rider emotion is contingent on the environment and behavior. If it is contingent then it becomes predictable. If it is predictable it becomes potentially usable for innovating new ways to improve the safety and utility of this important transport mode. Eighteen motorcyclists took part in a 15 km on-road study during which they were videoed, tracked via GPS, and followed by a ‘chase vehicle’ as they negotiated intersections, all the while providing a concurrent verbal commentary. The verbal commentary was content analysed using a novel method for mapping the verbalized emotional themes to the Circumplex Model. Network analysis was then used to explore the state changes between affective zones in the model. Riders’ emotions at intersections were found to vacillate between negative and positive affect, demonstrating high degrees of emotional dynamism. Many of these transitions occur in and out of the dominant positive state of calmness, with non-calm states appearing to be aversive and those which riders were seeking to avoid. Knowing this brings forward interesting new approaches for safe intersection design.

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Riding the emotional roller coaster [author accepted] - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 22 August 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 11 September 2019
Published date: 1 October 2019
Keywords: Circumplex model of affect, Emotion, Intersection, Motorcycles riding, Verbal protocol

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 435214
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/435214
ISSN: 1369-8478
PURE UUID: d4232a14-d3f5-42a6-85f0-c48542d9c44a
ORCID for Neville Stanton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8562-3279

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Oct 2019 16:30
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:13

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