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Global warming and artificial shorelines reshape seashore biogeography

Global warming and artificial shorelines reshape seashore biogeography
Global warming and artificial shorelines reshape seashore biogeography
Aim
Rapid anthropogenic warming coupled with changes in land use is altering the distributions of species, with consequences for ecosystem functioning and services. It is crucial to evaluate species range shifts based on understanding of the interaction of temperature with non‐climatic factors such as habitat availability and dispersal potential. Here, we aim to investigate roles of environmental temperature, habitat availability and population connectivity on the distributions of hard‐shore intertidal animals. We further examine potential roles of extensive artificial seawall construction in enabling poleward expansion of species in China, thus reshaping coastal biogeography.

Location
Chinese coast.
Time period
2013–2017.
Major taxa studied
Intertidal invertebrates.

Methods
We took an integrative approach encompassing distributional ecology, thermal physiology, molecular genetics, heat budget modelling and larval dispersal to elucidate how interacting multiple drivers, including temperature, habitat availability and larval dispersal, determine distributions of hard‐shore invertebrates, focusing on what sets their range edges at a boundary between biogeographic provinces.

Results
Our results untangle the complex interactions of global climate change with the impacts of regional scale coastal development. Temperature, larval transport and habitat availability are the major proximate factors controlling the range limits of coastal marine species. The artificial shorelines provide suitable habitats for hard‐shore species on the Yangtze River Delta, and minimum temperature in winter is an important factor setting the new northern range limit of these hard‐shore species along the Chinese coast.

Main conclusions
In the face of global warming and global sprawl of marine hard infrastructure, species distributions, community structures and biogeographic patterns are experiencing dramatic changes. The combined influence of multiple human stressors including climate change and artificial shorelines can be evaluated by using a multidisciplinary framework, including ecological distribution, physiological sensitivity of species to these stressors, and the role of dispersal in maintaining population connectivity.
1466-822X
Wang, Wei
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Wang, Jie
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Choi, Francis M. P.
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Ding, Ping
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Li, Xiao‐Xu
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Han, Guo‐Dong
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Ding, Meng‐Wen
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Guo, Minquan
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Huang, Xiong‐Wei
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Duan, Wei‐Xiang
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Cheng, Zhi‐Yuan
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Chen, Zhi‐Yuan
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Hawkins, Stephen J.
758fe1c1-30cd-4ed1-bb65-2471dc7c11fa
Jiang, Yuwu
8954763a-045d-48bc-b786-099072c02e58
Helmuth, Brian
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Dong, Yun‐Wei
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Dornelas, Maria
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Wang, Wei
8534fc2f-5969-40ab-aff5-96c97efaa922
Wang, Jie
6554e5ad-1ddd-485d-b954-89fee4685557
Choi, Francis M. P.
78a9da5b-6a74-42dd-a2c9-9f56e886efd3
Ding, Ping
e39793b6-1e6c-488c-b252-5c1c64c224fc
Li, Xiao‐Xu
a77f33c5-24cd-42f1-bebd-b2b46555f9e7
Han, Guo‐Dong
4104cc3b-e0c4-4ee5-9248-84cb9a64fceb
Ding, Meng‐Wen
af5989f3-212c-4fa2-a678-f4a8dbb5ff90
Guo, Minquan
21c64554-050a-4d48-b79b-2aa6df35a537
Huang, Xiong‐Wei
5b5ecb91-4627-4203-ba64-dc572fc0e1cb
Duan, Wei‐Xiang
ea54e841-7840-430b-bacd-f2fc9138dfb3
Cheng, Zhi‐Yuan
e3822c32-7e5b-4c87-9bd5-36de4025a7d0
Chen, Zhi‐Yuan
323ae204-5862-48e8-a438-7d11605b99ef
Hawkins, Stephen J.
758fe1c1-30cd-4ed1-bb65-2471dc7c11fa
Jiang, Yuwu
8954763a-045d-48bc-b786-099072c02e58
Helmuth, Brian
1c37bccc-7ec6-4d8f-8f14-be6f410089e3
Dong, Yun‐Wei
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Dornelas, Maria
8f24b856-a3d2-4671-a04e-931bf694ea1f

Wang, Wei, Wang, Jie, Choi, Francis M. P., Ding, Ping, Li, Xiao‐Xu, Han, Guo‐Dong, Ding, Meng‐Wen, Guo, Minquan, Huang, Xiong‐Wei, Duan, Wei‐Xiang, Cheng, Zhi‐Yuan, Chen, Zhi‐Yuan, Hawkins, Stephen J., Jiang, Yuwu, Helmuth, Brian, Dong, Yun‐Wei and Dornelas, Maria (2019) Global warming and artificial shorelines reshape seashore biogeography. Global Ecology and Biogeography. (doi:10.1111/geb.13019).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aim
Rapid anthropogenic warming coupled with changes in land use is altering the distributions of species, with consequences for ecosystem functioning and services. It is crucial to evaluate species range shifts based on understanding of the interaction of temperature with non‐climatic factors such as habitat availability and dispersal potential. Here, we aim to investigate roles of environmental temperature, habitat availability and population connectivity on the distributions of hard‐shore intertidal animals. We further examine potential roles of extensive artificial seawall construction in enabling poleward expansion of species in China, thus reshaping coastal biogeography.

Location
Chinese coast.
Time period
2013–2017.
Major taxa studied
Intertidal invertebrates.

Methods
We took an integrative approach encompassing distributional ecology, thermal physiology, molecular genetics, heat budget modelling and larval dispersal to elucidate how interacting multiple drivers, including temperature, habitat availability and larval dispersal, determine distributions of hard‐shore invertebrates, focusing on what sets their range edges at a boundary between biogeographic provinces.

Results
Our results untangle the complex interactions of global climate change with the impacts of regional scale coastal development. Temperature, larval transport and habitat availability are the major proximate factors controlling the range limits of coastal marine species. The artificial shorelines provide suitable habitats for hard‐shore species on the Yangtze River Delta, and minimum temperature in winter is an important factor setting the new northern range limit of these hard‐shore species along the Chinese coast.

Main conclusions
In the face of global warming and global sprawl of marine hard infrastructure, species distributions, community structures and biogeographic patterns are experiencing dramatic changes. The combined influence of multiple human stressors including climate change and artificial shorelines can be evaluated by using a multidisciplinary framework, including ecological distribution, physiological sensitivity of species to these stressors, and the role of dispersal in maintaining population connectivity.

Text
Revised_manuscript_10042019_with_supplementary_information - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 27 September 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 16 October 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 435668
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/435668
ISSN: 1466-822X
PURE UUID: a4ccdedc-941e-4ce1-aa1d-7c4fd3e4e8af

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Nov 2019 17:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 05:16

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Contributors

Author: Wei Wang
Author: Jie Wang
Author: Francis M. P. Choi
Author: Ping Ding
Author: Xiao‐Xu Li
Author: Guo‐Dong Han
Author: Meng‐Wen Ding
Author: Minquan Guo
Author: Xiong‐Wei Huang
Author: Wei‐Xiang Duan
Author: Zhi‐Yuan Cheng
Author: Zhi‐Yuan Chen
Author: Yuwu Jiang
Author: Brian Helmuth
Author: Yun‐Wei Dong
Author: Maria Dornelas

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