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Maternal B12, folate and homocysteine concentrations and offspring cortisol and cardiovascular responses to stress

Maternal B12, folate and homocysteine concentrations and offspring cortisol and cardiovascular responses to stress
Maternal B12, folate and homocysteine concentrations and offspring cortisol and cardiovascular responses to stress
Context Imbalances in maternal 1-carbon nutrients (vitamin B12, folate) have been shown to be associated with higher offspring cardiometabolic risk markers in India. Objective We examined the hypothesis that low plasma vitamin B12 (B12) and high folate and homocysteine concentrations in the mother are associated with higher hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis (cortisol) and cardiovascular responses during the Trier Social Stress Test for Children (TSST-C) in an Indian birth cohort. Methods Adolescents (n = 264; mean age: 13.6 years), whose mothers’ plasma B12, folate and total homocysteine concentrations had been measured during pregnancy, completed 5-minutes each of public speaking and mental arithmetic tasks in front of 2 unfamiliar “judges” (TSST-C). Baseline and poststress salivary cortisol concentrations were measured. Heart rate, blood pressure, stroke volume, cardiac output, and total peripheral resistance were measured continuously at baseline, during the TSST-C, and for 10 minutes after the TSST-C using a finger cuff; beat-to-beat values were averaged for these periods, respectively. Results Maternal low B12 status (plasma B12 < 150 pmol/L) was associated with greater cortisol responses to stress in the offspring (P < .001). Higher homocysteine concentrations were associated with greater offspring heart rate response (P < .001). After adjustment for multiple comparisons, there were nonsignificant associations between higher maternal folate concentrations and offspring total peripheral resistance response (P = .01). Conclusion Our findings suggest that maternal 1-carbon nutritional status may have long-term programming implications for offspring neuroendocrine stress responses.
B12 deficiency, adolescent, cortisol, folate, homocysteine, stress response
0021-972X
e2591–e2599
Krishnaveni, G.V.
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Veena, S.R.
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Johnson, Matthew James
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Kumaran, Kalyanaraman
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Jones, A.
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Bhat, D.S.
75412cda-4b68-4286-82e2-8f9ea39fd842
Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.
f5777038-bba7-49bd-80b9-be4e586eecf4
Fall, Caroline
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18
Krishnaveni, G.V.
9a5fc779-af1c-402a-9b7e-078f2820534b
Veena, S.R.
4e8cb003-69b8-48f6-863a-aba7907d0b8c
Johnson, Matthew James
d272ca76-f017-4457-96f5-daf6a7af6adf
Kumaran, Kalyanaraman
de6f872c-7339-4a52-be84-e3bbae707744
Jones, A.
81853a11-7995-4590-a888-0e2807ae379a
Bhat, D.S.
75412cda-4b68-4286-82e2-8f9ea39fd842
Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.
f5777038-bba7-49bd-80b9-be4e586eecf4
Fall, Caroline
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18

Krishnaveni, G.V., Veena, S.R., Johnson, Matthew James, Kumaran, Kalyanaraman, Jones, A., Bhat, D.S., Yajnik, Chittaranjan S. and Fall, Caroline (2020) Maternal B12, folate and homocysteine concentrations and offspring cortisol and cardiovascular responses to stress. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 105 (7), e2591–e2599, [dgz114]. (doi:10.1210/clinem/dgz114).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Context Imbalances in maternal 1-carbon nutrients (vitamin B12, folate) have been shown to be associated with higher offspring cardiometabolic risk markers in India. Objective We examined the hypothesis that low plasma vitamin B12 (B12) and high folate and homocysteine concentrations in the mother are associated with higher hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis (cortisol) and cardiovascular responses during the Trier Social Stress Test for Children (TSST-C) in an Indian birth cohort. Methods Adolescents (n = 264; mean age: 13.6 years), whose mothers’ plasma B12, folate and total homocysteine concentrations had been measured during pregnancy, completed 5-minutes each of public speaking and mental arithmetic tasks in front of 2 unfamiliar “judges” (TSST-C). Baseline and poststress salivary cortisol concentrations were measured. Heart rate, blood pressure, stroke volume, cardiac output, and total peripheral resistance were measured continuously at baseline, during the TSST-C, and for 10 minutes after the TSST-C using a finger cuff; beat-to-beat values were averaged for these periods, respectively. Results Maternal low B12 status (plasma B12 < 150 pmol/L) was associated with greater cortisol responses to stress in the offspring (P < .001). Higher homocysteine concentrations were associated with greater offspring heart rate response (P < .001). After adjustment for multiple comparisons, there were nonsignificant associations between higher maternal folate concentrations and offspring total peripheral resistance response (P = .01). Conclusion Our findings suggest that maternal 1-carbon nutritional status may have long-term programming implications for offspring neuroendocrine stress responses.

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Accepted/In Press date: 11 October 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 24 March 2020
Published date: 1 July 2020
Keywords: B12 deficiency, adolescent, cortisol, folate, homocysteine, stress response

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 435951
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/435951
ISSN: 0021-972X
PURE UUID: ee234c81-5219-4cf5-8705-a4fb146d5c15
ORCID for Caroline Fall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4402-5552

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Nov 2019 17:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:34

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Contributors

Author: G.V. Krishnaveni
Author: S.R. Veena
Author: Matthew James Johnson
Author: A. Jones
Author: D.S. Bhat
Author: Chittaranjan S. Yajnik
Author: Caroline Fall ORCID iD

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