The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The response of anguilliform fish to underwater sound under an experimental setting

The response of anguilliform fish to underwater sound under an experimental setting
The response of anguilliform fish to underwater sound under an experimental setting
Traditional physical screens designed to prevent fish entering dangerous areas (e.g. turbine intakes) can have negative impacts due to impingement or mechanical abrasion at high velocities. Behavioural deterrents may provide an alternative approach to screening. This study investigated the potential for a continuous broadband sound to modify the behaviour of two endangered species of anguilliform fish, European eel (Anguilla anguilla) and river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis). Experiments were conducted in an experimental channel. Eel and lamprey were respectively released upstream and downstream of an “acoustic maze”. A single individual released per trial encountered two successive chambers that offered a choice of passage through either an ensonified or a control (ambient noise only) corridor with a speaker turned off. Two possible configurations were tested to control for any lateral bias with positions of the activated speakers reversed. The influence of treatment, chamber, and configuration on route selection, rejection, and time to pass were tested. No influence of any of the three factors on route selection was observed for eel. River lamprey tended to pass through the ensonified corridor more often under configuration 2, but only in the first chamber. Both species were more likely to reject the ensonified corridors than the controls, and the time taken to pass these routes was greater for those that did so. For eel, the variation in time to pass was greater for the non-migratory (yellow phase) life-stage. While the acoustic signal used in this study influenced fish behaviour, the response observed would likely be insufficient to induce a strong deterrent effect in the field if used in isolation.
1535-1459
441-451
Deleau, Mathias
0c5300a5-cb7c-44bc-8630-ad00d4e8bf41
White, Paul
2dd2477b-5aa9-42e2-9d19-0806d994eaba
Peirson, Graeme
1da23731-b9a1-497b-9652-4009083aa8f2
Leighton, Timothy
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae
Kemp, Paul
9e33fba6-cccf-4eb5-965b-b70e72b11cd7
Deleau, Mathias
0c5300a5-cb7c-44bc-8630-ad00d4e8bf41
White, Paul
2dd2477b-5aa9-42e2-9d19-0806d994eaba
Peirson, Graeme
1da23731-b9a1-497b-9652-4009083aa8f2
Leighton, Timothy
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae
Kemp, Paul
9e33fba6-cccf-4eb5-965b-b70e72b11cd7

Deleau, Mathias, White, Paul, Peirson, Graeme, Leighton, Timothy and Kemp, Paul (2020) The response of anguilliform fish to underwater sound under an experimental setting. River Research and Applications, 36 (3), 441-451. (doi:10.1002/rra.3583).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Traditional physical screens designed to prevent fish entering dangerous areas (e.g. turbine intakes) can have negative impacts due to impingement or mechanical abrasion at high velocities. Behavioural deterrents may provide an alternative approach to screening. This study investigated the potential for a continuous broadband sound to modify the behaviour of two endangered species of anguilliform fish, European eel (Anguilla anguilla) and river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis). Experiments were conducted in an experimental channel. Eel and lamprey were respectively released upstream and downstream of an “acoustic maze”. A single individual released per trial encountered two successive chambers that offered a choice of passage through either an ensonified or a control (ambient noise only) corridor with a speaker turned off. Two possible configurations were tested to control for any lateral bias with positions of the activated speakers reversed. The influence of treatment, chamber, and configuration on route selection, rejection, and time to pass were tested. No influence of any of the three factors on route selection was observed for eel. River lamprey tended to pass through the ensonified corridor more often under configuration 2, but only in the first chamber. Both species were more likely to reject the ensonified corridors than the controls, and the time taken to pass these routes was greater for those that did so. For eel, the variation in time to pass was greater for the non-migratory (yellow phase) life-stage. While the acoustic signal used in this study influenced fish behaviour, the response observed would likely be insufficient to induce a strong deterrent effect in the field if used in isolation.

Text
V6 - Deleau Maze paper - Final PRW - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 24 January 2021.
Request a copy

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 20 November 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 24 January 2020
Published date: 1 March 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 436334
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/436334
ISSN: 1535-1459
PURE UUID: 112e3e31-5ddd-4fe3-a13e-4688a61d26c5
ORCID for Paul White: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4787-8713
ORCID for Timothy Leighton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1649-8750
ORCID for Paul Kemp: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4470-0589

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Dec 2019 17:30
Last modified: 23 Jul 2020 00:30

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Mathias Deleau
Author: Paul White ORCID iD
Author: Graeme Peirson
Author: Paul Kemp ORCID iD

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×