The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Children and young people with inflammatory bowel disease attend less school than their healthy peers

Children and young people with inflammatory bowel disease attend less school than their healthy peers
Children and young people with inflammatory bowel disease attend less school than their healthy peers
OBJECTIVE:
Chronic diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), can impact negatively on education and social development. Examining the impact of IBD on school/college attendance for children and young people (CYP) is vital to provide targeted support to patients, families and schools.

METHODS:
We performed a cross-sectional survey to determine the school/college attendance rates, the reasons for absence related to IBD and facilitators or barriers to school/college attendance. In a subset of patients followed up locally, we performed a detailed review of hospital attendance data to assess healthcare burden.

RESULTS:
Two hundred and thirty-one questionnaires were given to CYP with IBD aged 5-17 years. Response rate was 74% (final sample 169). The median school/college attendance rate was 92.5%, significantly lower than all children in England (95.2%). 39.6% of children with IBD were persistently absent, defined nationally as missing 10% or more of school. Only five children (3%) had a 100% attendance record. Increasing age and use of monoclonal therapy were predictors of poor school attendance. Concerns about feeling unwell at school/college, access to toilets, keeping up with work and teachers' understanding of IBD are the main issues for CYP with IBD. There was a significant negative correlation between number of days in hospital and school attendance.

CONCLUSION:
IBD has a significant impact on school/college attendance, with hospital attendance, disease burden and school difficulties being major factors. Employing strategies to minimise healthcare burden and developing a partnership between health and education to support children with IBD will serve to facilitate school/college attendance.
chronic illness, education, inflammatory bowel disease, paediatric, school
0003-9888
1-6
Barnes, C.L.
77f0a3c8-bff9-428a-bbcf-605297822109
Ashton, J.J.
03369017-99b5-40ae-9a43-14c98516f37d
Borca, F.
31fc3965-6bcf-4fd6-85bc-8b0f99f62473
Cullen, M.
d3dee1e2-b7bb-4c38-a94a-ae3e5cc0b544
Walker, D.-M.
5d4c78b7-4411-493e-8844-b64efc72a1e8
Beattie, R.M.
9a66af0b-f81c-485c-b01d-519403f0038a
Barnes, C.L.
77f0a3c8-bff9-428a-bbcf-605297822109
Ashton, J.J.
03369017-99b5-40ae-9a43-14c98516f37d
Borca, F.
31fc3965-6bcf-4fd6-85bc-8b0f99f62473
Cullen, M.
d3dee1e2-b7bb-4c38-a94a-ae3e5cc0b544
Walker, D.-M.
5d4c78b7-4411-493e-8844-b64efc72a1e8
Beattie, R.M.
9a66af0b-f81c-485c-b01d-519403f0038a

Barnes, C.L., Ashton, J.J., Borca, F., Cullen, M., Walker, D.-M. and Beattie, R.M. (2020) Children and young people with inflammatory bowel disease attend less school than their healthy peers. Archives of Disease in Childhood, 105 (7), 1-6, [317765]. (doi:10.1136/archdischild-2019-317765).

Record type: Article

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:
Chronic diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), can impact negatively on education and social development. Examining the impact of IBD on school/college attendance for children and young people (CYP) is vital to provide targeted support to patients, families and schools.

METHODS:
We performed a cross-sectional survey to determine the school/college attendance rates, the reasons for absence related to IBD and facilitators or barriers to school/college attendance. In a subset of patients followed up locally, we performed a detailed review of hospital attendance data to assess healthcare burden.

RESULTS:
Two hundred and thirty-one questionnaires were given to CYP with IBD aged 5-17 years. Response rate was 74% (final sample 169). The median school/college attendance rate was 92.5%, significantly lower than all children in England (95.2%). 39.6% of children with IBD were persistently absent, defined nationally as missing 10% or more of school. Only five children (3%) had a 100% attendance record. Increasing age and use of monoclonal therapy were predictors of poor school attendance. Concerns about feeling unwell at school/college, access to toilets, keeping up with work and teachers' understanding of IBD are the main issues for CYP with IBD. There was a significant negative correlation between number of days in hospital and school attendance.

CONCLUSION:
IBD has a significant impact on school/college attendance, with hospital attendance, disease burden and school difficulties being major factors. Employing strategies to minimise healthcare burden and developing a partnership between health and education to support children with IBD will serve to facilitate school/college attendance.

Text
Untracked_04_12_19_School Attendance - Accepted Manuscript
Download (1MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 12 December 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 14 January 2020
Keywords: chronic illness, education, inflammatory bowel disease, paediatric, school

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 436713
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/436713
ISSN: 0003-9888
PURE UUID: 92305bda-c7c1-4dc5-82b6-ce22c93cc612
ORCID for D.-M. Walker: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2135-1363

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Jan 2020 11:02
Last modified: 28 Apr 2022 02:12

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: C.L. Barnes
Author: J.J. Ashton
Author: F. Borca
Author: M. Cullen
Author: D.-M. Walker ORCID iD
Author: R.M. Beattie

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×