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Prioritising Hepatitis C treatment in people with multiple injecting partners maximises prevention: a real-world network study

Prioritising Hepatitis C treatment in people with multiple injecting partners maximises prevention: a real-world network study
Prioritising Hepatitis C treatment in people with multiple injecting partners maximises prevention: a real-world network study
Objective To describe an injecting network of PWID living in an isolated community on the Isle of Wight (UK) and the results of a agent-based simulation, testing the effect of Hepatitis C (HCV) treatment on transmission. Method People who inject drugs (PWID) were identified via respondent driven sampling and recruited to a network and bio-behavioural survey. The injecting network they described formed the baseline population and potential transmission pathways in an agent-based simulation of HCV transmission and the effects of treatment over 12 months. Results On average each PWID had 2.6 injecting partners (range 0-14) and 137 were connected into a single component. HCV in the network was associated with a higher proportion of positive injecting partners (p=0.003) and increasing age (p=0.011). The treatment of well-connected PWID led to significantly fewer new infections of HCV than treating at random (10 vs. 7, p<0.001). In all scenarios less than one individual was re-infected. Conclusion In our model the preferential treatment of well-connected PWID maximised treatment as prevention. In the real-world setting, targeting treatment to actively injecting PWID, with multiple injecting partners may therefore represent the most efficient elimination strategy for HCV.
0163-4453
225-231
Buchanan, Ryan
9499f713-f684-4046-be29-83cd9d6f834d
Meskarian, Rudabeh
932d1dac-784b-4f24-bdda-5ea34a16d8a2
Van Der Heijden, Peter
85157917-3b33-4683-81be-713f987fd612
Grellier, Leonie
5b353bf7-3bab-4510-8195-d5c9433b9f01
Parkes, Julie
59dc6de3-4018-415e-bb99-13552f97e984
Khakoo, Salim
6c16d2f5-ae80-4d9b-9100-6bfb34ad0273
Buchanan, Ryan
9499f713-f684-4046-be29-83cd9d6f834d
Meskarian, Rudabeh
932d1dac-784b-4f24-bdda-5ea34a16d8a2
Van Der Heijden, Peter
85157917-3b33-4683-81be-713f987fd612
Grellier, Leonie
5b353bf7-3bab-4510-8195-d5c9433b9f01
Parkes, Julie
59dc6de3-4018-415e-bb99-13552f97e984
Khakoo, Salim
6c16d2f5-ae80-4d9b-9100-6bfb34ad0273

Buchanan, Ryan, Meskarian, Rudabeh, Van Der Heijden, Peter, Grellier, Leonie, Parkes, Julie and Khakoo, Salim (2020) Prioritising Hepatitis C treatment in people with multiple injecting partners maximises prevention: a real-world network study. Journal of Infection, 80 (2), 225-231. (doi:10.1016/j.jinf.2019.12.010).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective To describe an injecting network of PWID living in an isolated community on the Isle of Wight (UK) and the results of a agent-based simulation, testing the effect of Hepatitis C (HCV) treatment on transmission. Method People who inject drugs (PWID) were identified via respondent driven sampling and recruited to a network and bio-behavioural survey. The injecting network they described formed the baseline population and potential transmission pathways in an agent-based simulation of HCV transmission and the effects of treatment over 12 months. Results On average each PWID had 2.6 injecting partners (range 0-14) and 137 were connected into a single component. HCV in the network was associated with a higher proportion of positive injecting partners (p=0.003) and increasing age (p=0.011). The treatment of well-connected PWID led to significantly fewer new infections of HCV than treating at random (10 vs. 7, p<0.001). In all scenarios less than one individual was re-infected. Conclusion In our model the preferential treatment of well-connected PWID maximised treatment as prevention. In the real-world setting, targeting treatment to actively injecting PWID, with multiple injecting partners may therefore represent the most efficient elimination strategy for HCV.

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Restricted to Repository staff only until 28 December 2020.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 23 December 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 28 December 2019
Published date: February 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 436940
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/436940
ISSN: 0163-4453
PURE UUID: fac9aece-a3a2-474d-89ee-4b85f8e3c04b
ORCID for Peter Van Der Heijden: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3345-096X
ORCID for Julie Parkes: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6490-395X

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Date deposited: 14 Jan 2020 17:31
Last modified: 08 Feb 2020 01:32

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