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Exploratory full-field strain analysis of regenerated bone tissue from osteoinductive biomaterials

Exploratory full-field strain analysis of regenerated bone tissue from osteoinductive biomaterials
Exploratory full-field strain analysis of regenerated bone tissue from osteoinductive biomaterials
Biomaterials for bone regeneration are constantly under development, and their application in critical-sized defects represents a promising alternative to bone grafting techniques. However, the ability of all these materials to produce bone mechanically comparable with the native tissue remains unclear. This study aims to explore the full-field strain evolution in newly formed bone tissue produced in vivo by different osteoinductive strategies, including delivery systems for BMP-2 release. In situ high-resolution X-ray micro-computed tomography (microCT) and digital volume correlation (DVC) were used to qualitatively assess the micromechanics of regenerated bone tissue. Local strain in the tissue was evaluated in relation to the different bone morphometry and mineralization for specimens (n = 2 p/treatment) retrieved at a single time point (10 weeks in vivo). Results indicated a variety of load-transfer ability for the different treatments, highlighting the mechanical adaptation of bone structure in the early stages of bone healing. Although exploratory due to the limited sample size, the findings and analysis reported herein suggest how the combination of microCT and DVC can provide enhanced understanding of the micromechanics of newly formed bone produced in vivo, with the potential to inform further development of novel bone regeneration approaches.
Biomaterials, Bone regeneration, Digital volume correlation, In situ mechanics, microCT
Pena Fernandez, Marta
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Black, Cameron
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Dawson, Jonathan
b220fe76-498d-47be-9995-92da6c289cf3
Gibbs, David
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Kanczler, Janos
eb8db9ff-a038-475f-9030-48eef2b0559c
Oreffo, Richard O.C.
ff9fff72-6855-4d0f-bfb2-311d0e8f3778
Tozzi, Gianluca
d9d96325-6d17-4b76-8e45-05727e45c694
Pena Fernandez, Marta
4c6666e9-2951-4a03-a786-97596e2f4f74
Black, Cameron
7f616e37-4d80-4f60-ac8d-ba96e583db72
Dawson, Jonathan
b220fe76-498d-47be-9995-92da6c289cf3
Gibbs, David
4e8e4ea5-eaf5-4f93-8baf-88b524885893
Kanczler, Janos
eb8db9ff-a038-475f-9030-48eef2b0559c
Oreffo, Richard O.C.
ff9fff72-6855-4d0f-bfb2-311d0e8f3778
Tozzi, Gianluca
d9d96325-6d17-4b76-8e45-05727e45c694

Pena Fernandez, Marta, Black, Cameron, Dawson, Jonathan, Gibbs, David, Kanczler, Janos, Oreffo, Richard O.C. and Tozzi, Gianluca (2020) Exploratory full-field strain analysis of regenerated bone tissue from osteoinductive biomaterials. Materials, 13 (1), [168]. (doi:10.3390/ma13010168).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Biomaterials for bone regeneration are constantly under development, and their application in critical-sized defects represents a promising alternative to bone grafting techniques. However, the ability of all these materials to produce bone mechanically comparable with the native tissue remains unclear. This study aims to explore the full-field strain evolution in newly formed bone tissue produced in vivo by different osteoinductive strategies, including delivery systems for BMP-2 release. In situ high-resolution X-ray micro-computed tomography (microCT) and digital volume correlation (DVC) were used to qualitatively assess the micromechanics of regenerated bone tissue. Local strain in the tissue was evaluated in relation to the different bone morphometry and mineralization for specimens (n = 2 p/treatment) retrieved at a single time point (10 weeks in vivo). Results indicated a variety of load-transfer ability for the different treatments, highlighting the mechanical adaptation of bone structure in the early stages of bone healing. Although exploratory due to the limited sample size, the findings and analysis reported herein suggest how the combination of microCT and DVC can provide enhanced understanding of the micromechanics of newly formed bone produced in vivo, with the potential to inform further development of novel bone regeneration approaches.

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Accepted/In Press date: 28 December 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 1 January 2020
Published date: 1 January 2020
Keywords: Biomaterials, Bone regeneration, Digital volume correlation, In situ mechanics, microCT

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 436952
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/436952
PURE UUID: 0d72dfa0-07c2-4d6e-b8de-1c600278a879
ORCID for Jonathan Dawson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6712-0598
ORCID for Janos Kanczler: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7249-0414
ORCID for Richard O.C. Oreffo: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5995-6726

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Jan 2020 17:32
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:53

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Contributors

Author: Marta Pena Fernandez
Author: Cameron Black
Author: Jonathan Dawson ORCID iD
Author: David Gibbs
Author: Janos Kanczler ORCID iD
Author: Gianluca Tozzi

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