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Longitudinal life course perspectives on housing inequality in young adulthood

Longitudinal life course perspectives on housing inequality in young adulthood
Longitudinal life course perspectives on housing inequality in young adulthood
In many countries, there is growing public concern about the increasing difficulties that young people face in obtaining secure, affordable, high quality and well-located housing. Much of the analysis and discussion focuses on the ways in which intergenerational housing inequalities have deepened over time as young adults’ fortunes have deteriorated, most obviously through declining access to homeownership. In this review, we showcase how researchers are harnessing life course theories and rich longitudinal datasets, exploiting longitudinal modelling techniques, and developing new geographical data linkages to enhance our knowledge of a broader range of housing inequalities in young adulthood. We argue that incorporating these longitudinal perspectives more fully into geographical research and teaching will foster an enriched pluralistic model of quantitative human geography that is characterised by collaboration, critical engagement with policy issues, and sensitivity to the strengths and challenges of working in an integrated fashion with varied forms of numerical data.
Data structures; housing; inequality; policy; young people
1749-8198
Coulter, Rory
e72ed072-eb34-4919-bfcb-8ad71d7f85e5
Bayrakdar, Sait
38d7f582-f81a-4976-9876-f76004142410
Berrington, Ann
bd0fc093-310d-4236-8126-ca0c7eb9ddde
Coulter, Rory
e72ed072-eb34-4919-bfcb-8ad71d7f85e5
Bayrakdar, Sait
38d7f582-f81a-4976-9876-f76004142410
Berrington, Ann
bd0fc093-310d-4236-8126-ca0c7eb9ddde

Coulter, Rory, Bayrakdar, Sait and Berrington, Ann (2020) Longitudinal life course perspectives on housing inequality in young adulthood. Geography Compass, 14 (5), [e12488]. (doi:10.1111/gec3.12488).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In many countries, there is growing public concern about the increasing difficulties that young people face in obtaining secure, affordable, high quality and well-located housing. Much of the analysis and discussion focuses on the ways in which intergenerational housing inequalities have deepened over time as young adults’ fortunes have deteriorated, most obviously through declining access to homeownership. In this review, we showcase how researchers are harnessing life course theories and rich longitudinal datasets, exploiting longitudinal modelling techniques, and developing new geographical data linkages to enhance our knowledge of a broader range of housing inequalities in young adulthood. We argue that incorporating these longitudinal perspectives more fully into geographical research and teaching will foster an enriched pluralistic model of quantitative human geography that is characterised by collaboration, critical engagement with policy issues, and sensitivity to the strengths and challenges of working in an integrated fashion with varied forms of numerical data.

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Accepted/In Press date: 12 January 2020
Published date: 5 February 2020
Keywords: Data structures; housing; inequality; policy; young people

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 437152
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/437152
ISSN: 1749-8198
PURE UUID: a4435b66-86a6-40b6-93e5-44e9121d83f4
ORCID for Ann Berrington: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1683-6668

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Date deposited: 20 Jan 2020 17:31
Last modified: 28 Apr 2022 01:38

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Contributors

Author: Rory Coulter
Author: Sait Bayrakdar
Author: Ann Berrington ORCID iD

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