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Associations between early-life screen viewing and 24 hour movement behaviours: findings from a longitudinal birth cohort study

Associations between early-life screen viewing and 24 hour movement behaviours: findings from a longitudinal birth cohort study
Associations between early-life screen viewing and 24 hour movement behaviours: findings from a longitudinal birth cohort study
Background

Screen viewing is a sedentary behaviour reported to interfere with sleep and physical activity. However, few longitudinal studies have assessed such associations in children of preschool age (0–6 years) and none have accounted for the compositional nature of these behaviours. We aimed to investigate the associations between total and device-specific screen viewing time at age 2–3 years and accelerometer-measured 24 h movement behaviours, including sleep, sedentary behaviour, light physical activity, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) at age 5·5 years.

Methods

The Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) study is an ongoing longitudinal birth cohort study in Singapore, which began in June 2009. We recruited pregnant women during their first ultrasound scan visit at two major public maternity units in Singapore. At clinic visits done at age 2–3 years, we collected parent-reported information about children's daily total and device-specific screen viewing time (television, handheld devices, and computers). At 5·5 years, children's movement behaviours for 7 consecutive days were measured using wrist-worn accelerometers. We assessed the associations between screen viewing time and movement behaviours (sedentary behaviour, light physical activity, MVPA, and sleep) using Dirichlet regression, which accounts for the compositional nature of such behaviours. This study is active but not recruiting and is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01174875.

Findings

Between June 1, 2009, and Oct 12, 2010, 1247 pregnant women enrolled and 1171 singleton births were enrolled. 987 children had parent-reported screen data at either 2 or 3 years, of whom 840 attended the clinic visit at age 5·5 years, and 577 wore an accelerometer. 552 children had at least 3 days of accelerometer data and were included in the analysis. Total screen viewing time at age 2–3 years had a significant negative association with sleep (p=0·008), light physical activity (p<0·0001), and MVPA (p<0·0001) in relation to sedentary behaviour at age 5·5 years. Compared with children who spent 1 h or less per day screen viewing at age 2–3 years, children who screen viewed for 3 h or more per day at 2–3 years engaged in more sedentary behaviour (439·8 mins per day [≤1 h screen viewing time] vs480·0 mins per day [≥3 h screen viewing time]), and less light physical activity (384·6 vs 356·2 mins per day), and MVPA (76·2 vs 63·4 mins per day) at age 5·5 years. No significant differences in time spent sleeping were observed between the groups (539·5 vs 540·4 mins per day). Similar trends were observed for television viewing and handheld device viewing.

Interpretation

Longer screen viewing time in children aged 2–3 years was associated with more time spent engaged in sedentary behaviour and shorter time engaged in light physical activity and MVPA in later childhood. Our findings indicate that screen viewing might displace physical activity during early childhood, and suggest that reducing screen viewing time in early childhood might promote healthier behaviours and associated outcomes later in life.

Funding

Singapore National Research Foundation, and Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, Agency for Science Technology and Research (A*STAR).

2352-4650
201-209
Chen, Bozhi
7c1f7f8a-8b70-4af0-a46a-75fe4cf97502
Bernard, Jonathan Y.
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Natarajan, Padmapriya
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Ning, Yilin
543a60f3-3790-474f-8c2e-853c3a5edf96
Cai, Shirong
0d23d2c5-889d-4f33-887f-b52e3d341ba4
Lanca, Carla
8b3174ad-f727-4ec2-a0a1-0408d1e089a9
Tan, K.H.
5088c221-ae35-4063-a5b0-84565963688b
Yap, F.
166590c9-89d7-41e3-ab73-1c555b39c3bf
Chong, Yap-Seng
7043124b-e892-4d4b-8bb7-6d35ed94e136
Shek, Lynette
517f03d8-e62a-43bd-aabe-d76d870a81ea
Godfrey, Keith
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Saw, S-M.
d308600d-81e3-43fd-aae6-24405627e55e
Chan, Shiao-Yng
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Eriksson, Johan G.
eb96b1c5-af07-4a52-8a73-7541451d32cd
Tan, C.S.
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Müller-Riemenschneider, Falk
b308e28e-08ef-4eac-9eab-1cc0a4105c9f
Chen, Bozhi
7c1f7f8a-8b70-4af0-a46a-75fe4cf97502
Bernard, Jonathan Y.
c831fc27-9e1a-46ca-b335-859e14c5083b
Natarajan, Padmapriya
d8250c99-1fe6-4650-82c2-8ccf04f3915c
Ning, Yilin
543a60f3-3790-474f-8c2e-853c3a5edf96
Cai, Shirong
0d23d2c5-889d-4f33-887f-b52e3d341ba4
Lanca, Carla
8b3174ad-f727-4ec2-a0a1-0408d1e089a9
Tan, K.H.
5088c221-ae35-4063-a5b0-84565963688b
Yap, F.
166590c9-89d7-41e3-ab73-1c555b39c3bf
Chong, Yap-Seng
7043124b-e892-4d4b-8bb7-6d35ed94e136
Shek, Lynette
517f03d8-e62a-43bd-aabe-d76d870a81ea
Godfrey, Keith
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Saw, S-M.
d308600d-81e3-43fd-aae6-24405627e55e
Chan, Shiao-Yng
3c9d8970-2cc4-430a-86a7-96f6029a5293
Eriksson, Johan G.
eb96b1c5-af07-4a52-8a73-7541451d32cd
Tan, C.S.
d395e487-a4c8-4ee0-b7f1-f326798dfb26
Müller-Riemenschneider, Falk
b308e28e-08ef-4eac-9eab-1cc0a4105c9f

Chen, Bozhi, Bernard, Jonathan Y., Natarajan, Padmapriya, Ning, Yilin, Cai, Shirong, Lanca, Carla, Tan, K.H., Yap, F., Chong, Yap-Seng, Shek, Lynette, Godfrey, Keith, Saw, S-M., Chan, Shiao-Yng, Eriksson, Johan G., Tan, C.S. and Müller-Riemenschneider, Falk (2020) Associations between early-life screen viewing and 24 hour movement behaviours: findings from a longitudinal birth cohort study. The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, 4 (3), 201-209. (doi:10.1016/S2352-4642(19)30424-9).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background

Screen viewing is a sedentary behaviour reported to interfere with sleep and physical activity. However, few longitudinal studies have assessed such associations in children of preschool age (0–6 years) and none have accounted for the compositional nature of these behaviours. We aimed to investigate the associations between total and device-specific screen viewing time at age 2–3 years and accelerometer-measured 24 h movement behaviours, including sleep, sedentary behaviour, light physical activity, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) at age 5·5 years.

Methods

The Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) study is an ongoing longitudinal birth cohort study in Singapore, which began in June 2009. We recruited pregnant women during their first ultrasound scan visit at two major public maternity units in Singapore. At clinic visits done at age 2–3 years, we collected parent-reported information about children's daily total and device-specific screen viewing time (television, handheld devices, and computers). At 5·5 years, children's movement behaviours for 7 consecutive days were measured using wrist-worn accelerometers. We assessed the associations between screen viewing time and movement behaviours (sedentary behaviour, light physical activity, MVPA, and sleep) using Dirichlet regression, which accounts for the compositional nature of such behaviours. This study is active but not recruiting and is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01174875.

Findings

Between June 1, 2009, and Oct 12, 2010, 1247 pregnant women enrolled and 1171 singleton births were enrolled. 987 children had parent-reported screen data at either 2 or 3 years, of whom 840 attended the clinic visit at age 5·5 years, and 577 wore an accelerometer. 552 children had at least 3 days of accelerometer data and were included in the analysis. Total screen viewing time at age 2–3 years had a significant negative association with sleep (p=0·008), light physical activity (p<0·0001), and MVPA (p<0·0001) in relation to sedentary behaviour at age 5·5 years. Compared with children who spent 1 h or less per day screen viewing at age 2–3 years, children who screen viewed for 3 h or more per day at 2–3 years engaged in more sedentary behaviour (439·8 mins per day [≤1 h screen viewing time] vs480·0 mins per day [≥3 h screen viewing time]), and less light physical activity (384·6 vs 356·2 mins per day), and MVPA (76·2 vs 63·4 mins per day) at age 5·5 years. No significant differences in time spent sleeping were observed between the groups (539·5 vs 540·4 mins per day). Similar trends were observed for television viewing and handheld device viewing.

Interpretation

Longer screen viewing time in children aged 2–3 years was associated with more time spent engaged in sedentary behaviour and shorter time engaged in light physical activity and MVPA in later childhood. Our findings indicate that screen viewing might displace physical activity during early childhood, and suggest that reducing screen viewing time in early childhood might promote healthier behaviours and associated outcomes later in life.

Funding

Singapore National Research Foundation, and Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, Agency for Science Technology and Research (A*STAR).

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 11 December 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 28 January 2020
Published date: March 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 437210
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/437210
ISSN: 2352-4650
PURE UUID: f875cc1b-c7d9-4464-a59f-09944e7995d3
ORCID for Keith Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Jan 2020 17:37
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 06:32

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Contributors

Author: Bozhi Chen
Author: Jonathan Y. Bernard
Author: Padmapriya Natarajan
Author: Yilin Ning
Author: Shirong Cai
Author: Carla Lanca
Author: K.H. Tan
Author: F. Yap
Author: Yap-Seng Chong
Author: Lynette Shek
Author: Keith Godfrey ORCID iD
Author: S-M. Saw
Author: Shiao-Yng Chan
Author: Johan G. Eriksson
Author: C.S. Tan
Author: Falk Müller-Riemenschneider

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