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Use of a twin-inverted pulse sonar (TWIPS) to discern between solid objects and bubbles

Use of a twin-inverted pulse sonar (TWIPS) to discern between solid objects and bubbles
Use of a twin-inverted pulse sonar (TWIPS) to discern between solid objects and bubbles
This thesis shows how a twin-inverted pulse sonar (TWIPS) can take advantage of nonlinear bubble dynamics to suppress undesirable bubble clutter in sonar systems. This sonar requires the production of two high-amplitude pulses in short succession, the second of which must be 180° out of phase with the first. It will be shown that the echoes from these excitations can be combined to selectively suppress between even- and odd- harmonic energy. After a simulation is used to prove the TWIPS concept, an experiment will be described wherein this method was tested in a controlled environment on a replicated oceanic bubble cloud. The novel bubble-cloud generating machine will be described in detail. The results from a TWIPS sea-trial will then be used to show that the method works not only in controlled environments, but also in the open water. Finally, a review will explore newly-discovered links between the echolocation abilities of acoustically-active, coastally restricted cetaceans and TWIPS. That review will show using pre-existing data that some coastal dolphin species seem capable of generating pulse-pairs wherein the second pulse is 180° out of phase with the first.
University of Southampton
Finfer, Daniel
82fdc146-00f8-45d8-ad9e-c7bb8d0686cf
Finfer, Daniel
82fdc146-00f8-45d8-ad9e-c7bb8d0686cf
Leighton, Timothy G.
733685ac-3416-43a0-9a65-7728dc043408

Finfer, Daniel (2009) Use of a twin-inverted pulse sonar (TWIPS) to discern between solid objects and bubbles. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 278pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

This thesis shows how a twin-inverted pulse sonar (TWIPS) can take advantage of nonlinear bubble dynamics to suppress undesirable bubble clutter in sonar systems. This sonar requires the production of two high-amplitude pulses in short succession, the second of which must be 180° out of phase with the first. It will be shown that the echoes from these excitations can be combined to selectively suppress between even- and odd- harmonic energy. After a simulation is used to prove the TWIPS concept, an experiment will be described wherein this method was tested in a controlled environment on a replicated oceanic bubble cloud. The novel bubble-cloud generating machine will be described in detail. The results from a TWIPS sea-trial will then be used to show that the method works not only in controlled environments, but also in the open water. Finally, a review will explore newly-discovered links between the echolocation abilities of acoustically-active, coastally restricted cetaceans and TWIPS. That review will show using pre-existing data that some coastal dolphin species seem capable of generating pulse-pairs wherein the second pulse is 180° out of phase with the first.

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Finfer - Version of Record
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
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More information

Published date: 1 July 2009

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 437396
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/437396
PURE UUID: 0893c7f7-b9eb-4497-9f1c-447ad53adfe7

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Date deposited: 29 Jan 2020 17:33
Last modified: 12 Dec 2021 08:14

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Contributors

Author: Daniel Finfer
Thesis advisor: Timothy G. Leighton

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