The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Reviving Bloom’s taxonomy

Reviving Bloom’s taxonomy
Reviving Bloom’s taxonomy
The cognitive revolution and the increased focus on evidence-based practice that has swept through the teaching profession in recent years has undoubtedly brought with it many positive outcomes. Yet in the rush to embrace the modern, it would be wise to remember that many of these new ideas have very old roots, and rather than disregard the ancestral wisdom of our profession, we would be wise to look for guidance at the successes and failures of our forebears. Doing otherwise will inevitably lead to the educational equivalent of reinventing the wheel, and one need not look far for pertinent examples – after all, are Bruner’s (Wood et al. 1976) thoughts on scaffolding so very different from cognitive load’s guidance fading? Similarly, it does not take a huge leap of the imagination to see Ausubel’s (1960) advance organisers and the more modern knowledge organisers as examples of the educational version of parallel evolution. However, this cyclical tendency is not inevitable, and the current interest in mastery learning provides a wonderful opportunity to escape the reinvention trap by building on and learning from one of the classics of educational literature, Bloom’s taxonomy.
2514-6955
Bokhove, Christian
7fc17e5b-9a94-48f3-a387-2ccf60d2d5d8
Campbell, Ryan
21393cab-98e3-4214-85d1-868afc9449cb
Bokhove, Christian
7fc17e5b-9a94-48f3-a387-2ccf60d2d5d8
Campbell, Ryan
21393cab-98e3-4214-85d1-868afc9449cb

Bokhove, Christian and Campbell, Ryan (2020) Reviving Bloom’s taxonomy. Impact, 8.

Record type: Article

Abstract

The cognitive revolution and the increased focus on evidence-based practice that has swept through the teaching profession in recent years has undoubtedly brought with it many positive outcomes. Yet in the rush to embrace the modern, it would be wise to remember that many of these new ideas have very old roots, and rather than disregard the ancestral wisdom of our profession, we would be wise to look for guidance at the successes and failures of our forebears. Doing otherwise will inevitably lead to the educational equivalent of reinventing the wheel, and one need not look far for pertinent examples – after all, are Bruner’s (Wood et al. 1976) thoughts on scaffolding so very different from cognitive load’s guidance fading? Similarly, it does not take a huge leap of the imagination to see Ausubel’s (1960) advance organisers and the more modern knowledge organisers as examples of the educational version of parallel evolution. However, this cyclical tendency is not inevitable, and the current interest in mastery learning provides a wonderful opportunity to escape the reinvention trap by building on and learning from one of the classics of educational literature, Bloom’s taxonomy.

Text
RevivedBloom_revision accepted manuscript - Accepted Manuscript
Download (21kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 9 January 2020
Published date: 29 January 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 437441
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/437441
ISSN: 2514-6955
PURE UUID: 1a29bf7e-e698-48c8-a265-3ffc87bf6d52
ORCID for Christian Bokhove: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4860-8723

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 30 Jan 2020 17:37
Last modified: 10 Jan 2022 06:29

Export record

Contributors

Author: Ryan Campbell

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×