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A new concept in the design of finite automata

A new concept in the design of finite automata
A new concept in the design of finite automata
In recent years considerable effort has been brought to bear upon problems arising in the field of Computer Aided Design. Total mechanization of this design process has generally proved difficult and many successful projects have relied upon a certain measure of human interaction. This thesis proposes and discusses an approach to the automatic design problem in which computer searches are guided by an evolutionary process of random change followed by empirical evaluation. In support of the theory evolutionary methods have been applied to two problems. Firstly a practical method for the reduction of very large finite-state machines is proposed and evaluated. Secondly an evolutionary search is used in the automatic design of an economical set of features for the recognition of OCR B printed characters. Detailed results are presented which give a clear indication of the novel performance o the system. Although the performance falls short of that associated with many commercial equipments, the results are shown to compare favourable with those achieved by an independently and intuitively designed set of features. It is suggested that the work can be extended to Optical Character Recognition problems involving many fonts, and also to problems of fingerprint classification.
University of Southampton
Stentiford, Frederick
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Stentiford, Frederick
dcf0f483-9a84-4416-b2dc-cc6340e62ab3
Lewin, D.W.
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Stentiford, Frederick (1974) A new concept in the design of finite automata. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 152pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

In recent years considerable effort has been brought to bear upon problems arising in the field of Computer Aided Design. Total mechanization of this design process has generally proved difficult and many successful projects have relied upon a certain measure of human interaction. This thesis proposes and discusses an approach to the automatic design problem in which computer searches are guided by an evolutionary process of random change followed by empirical evaluation. In support of the theory evolutionary methods have been applied to two problems. Firstly a practical method for the reduction of very large finite-state machines is proposed and evaluated. Secondly an evolutionary search is used in the automatic design of an economical set of features for the recognition of OCR B printed characters. Detailed results are presented which give a clear indication of the novel performance o the system. Although the performance falls short of that associated with many commercial equipments, the results are shown to compare favourable with those achieved by an independently and intuitively designed set of features. It is suggested that the work can be extended to Optical Character Recognition problems involving many fonts, and also to problems of fingerprint classification.

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Published date: 1 January 1974

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 437553
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/437553
PURE UUID: e9683ab7-0c49-4b04-9b95-83b0f16c8620

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Date deposited: 05 Feb 2020 17:31
Last modified: 12 Dec 2021 08:20

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Contributors

Author: Frederick Stentiford
Thesis advisor: D.W. Lewin

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